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The Writings of Charles De Koninck

Volume 1

Charles De Koninck

Publication Year: 2008

The Writings of Charles De Koninck, Volume 1, introduces a projected three-volume series that presents the first English edition of the collected works of the Catholic Thomist philosopher Charles De Koninck (1906–1965). Ralph McInerny is the project editor and has prepared the excellent translations. The first volume contains writings ranging from De Koninck’s 1934 dissertation at the University of Louvain on the philosophy of Sir Arthur Eddington, to two remarkable early essays on indeterminism and the unpublished book “The Cosmos.” The short essay “Are the Experimental Sciences Distinct from the Philosophy of Nature?” is also included and demonstrates for the first time De Koninck’s distinctive view on the relation between philosophy of nature and the experimental sciences. A comprehensive introductory essay by Leslie Armour outlines the structure and themes of De Koninck's philosophy. The volume begins with a biographical essay by De Koninck’s son, Thomas.

Published by: University of Notre Dame Press

Title Page, Copyright

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Preface

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pp. viii-x

A few years ago, David Quackenbush, a tutor at Thomas Aquinas College in California, conceived the idea of photocopying the Charles De Koninck archives at the University of Laval. Thomas De Koninck gave the open sesame, . . .

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The Philosophy of Charles De Koninck

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pp. 1-68

Charles De Koninck devoted his philosophical career to answering three of the questions which have most exercised contemporary men and women: How can we understand the growing chasm between our scientific world . . .

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Charles De Koninck:A Biographical Sketch

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pp. 69-97

Charles De Koninck was born on 29 July 1906, in Torhout, Belgium—a small town in West Flanders, close to Bruges.1 Both his mother,Marie Verplancke, and his father, Louis De Koninck, hailed from Torhout as well. They . . .

The Philosophy of Sir Arthur Eddington

Part One

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p. 101-101

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Introduction

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pp. 103-104

Sir Arthur Eddington was born in Kendal, England, on 28 December 1882. His father was the principal of the Quaker School at Stramongate, the school in which John Dalton had been sub-master. Eddington himself is a fervent . . .

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Epistemology and Metaphysics

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pp. 105-109

Let us review the chief original contributions of Eddington to science in the experimental domain as well as in the domain of theory. This will enable us better to situate his personality. For it must be acknowledged that Eddington . . .

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The Philosophy of Exact Science

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pp. 110-144

In the second and third sections we propose to give as objective as possible an exposition of the doctrine contained in the different philosophical works of our author. Is this possible? Let us from the outset introduce necessary . . .

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Critical Considerations

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pp. 145-171

It seems to us that there is nothing in these fundamental theses of Eddington’s critique of science that we could contest. On the contrary. The fundamental points of this new philosophy of science have already been . . .

Part Two

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p. 173-173

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Epistemology and Metaphysics

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pp. 175-206

We have already said that Eddington has no intention of giving us a coherent and achieved system of philosophy. His intention is rather to make some suggestions. Above all, he addresses his colleagues who deny too easily that . . .

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Critical Considerations

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pp. 207-218

One might expect that I would launch a rather severe criticism of these considerations risked by Eddington. And one might perhaps expect an apology for taking it all so seriously and even for seeking links with our metaphysics, . . .

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General Conclusion

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pp. 219-233

So we come quite abruptly to the end of our study. Eddington very likely would not enjoy seeing his ideas cut up as we have done. But others have done it to criticize him, and we have followed an analogous procedure to . . .

The Cosmos

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From a Scientific Point of View

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pp. 237-256

Einstein, in his celebrated theory of relativity, shows an entire universe in profile: a universe closed on itself, its total volume finite, but without limits like the surface of an egg.We thus rid our minds of the vague diffused infinite . . .

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The Philosophical Point of View

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pp. 257-321

By the term ‘nature,’ taken in a general sense, we mean the coordinated ensemble of spatio-temporal things which surround us and of which we are a part. Becoming is the common and specific character of each thing in this . . .

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The Theological Point of View

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pp. 322-354

The rational creature can know God in an explicit manner insofar as He is cause of all being, insofar as He is being in the full sense. But we also know that this knowledge is superficial, that God has properties which are . . .

The Problem of Indeterminism

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pp. 355-400

Reflections on the Problem of Indeterminism

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pp. 401-442

Are the Experimental Sciences Distinct from the Philosophy of Nature?

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pp. 443-456

Index

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pp. 457-482

About the Author

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p. 483-483


E-ISBN-13: 9780268077631
E-ISBN-10: 0268077630
Print-ISBN-13: 9780268025953
Print-ISBN-10: 0268025959

Page Count: 496
Publication Year: 2008

Volume Title: Volume 1

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Subject Headings

  • Koninck, Charles de, d. 1965.
  • Science -- Philosophy.
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