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Companion to Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy

Edited by Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu, and Alejandro Vallega

Publication Year: 2001

Companion to Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy

Edited by Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu, and Alejandro Vallega

A key to unlocking one of Heidegger's most difficult and important works.

The publication of the first English translation of Martin Heidegger's Beiträge zur Philosophie (Vom Ereignis) marked a significant event for Heidegger studies. Considered by scholars to be his most important work after Being and Time, Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning) elaborates what Heidegger calls "being-historical-thinking," a project in which he undertakes to reshape what it means both to think and to be. Contributions is an indispensable book for scholars and students of Heidegger, but it is also one of his most difficult because of its aphoristic style and unusual language. In this Companion 14 eminent Heidegger scholars share strategies for reading and understanding this challenging work. Overall approaches for becoming familiar with Heidegger's unique language and thinking are included, along with detailed readings of key sections of the work. Experienced readers and those coming to the text for the first time will find the Companion an invaluable guide to this pivotal text in Heidegger's philosophical corpus.

Contributors include Walter A. Brogan, David Crownfield, Parvis Emad, Günter Figal, Kenneth Maly, William McNeill, Richard Polt, John Sallis, Susan Schoenbohm, Charles E. Scott, Dennis J. Schmidt, Alejandro Vallega, Daniela Vallega-Neu, and Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann.

Charles E. Scott is Professor of Philosophy at Pennsylvania State University. He is author of The Question of Ethics, On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Ethics and Politics (both Indiana University Press), and The Time of Memory.

Susan Schoenbohm has taught philosophy at Vanderbilt University, The University of the South, and Pennsylvania State University. She has published several articles on Heidegger, contemporary Continental thought, ancient Greek thought, and ancient Asian thought.

Daniela Vallega-Neu teaches philosophy at California State University, Stanislaus. She is author of Die Notwendigkeit der Grundung in Zeitalter der Deconstruction.

Alejandro Vallega teaches philosophy at California State University, Stanislaus.

Studies in Continental Thought -- John Sallis, general editor
July 2001
288 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4
cloth 0-253-33946-4 $44.95 L /

Published by: Indiana University Press

Title page, copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-

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Introduction: Approaching Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy and Its Companion

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pp. 1-12

An unusual way of thinking comes to expression in Heidegger’s Contributions To Philosophy (From Enowning).1 He “made” this “book” by combining reflections on an extraordinary number of topics that include thoughts on thinking and the grounds for thinking, observations about...

Part 1. Approaches

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1 Reading Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy: An Orientation

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pp. 15-31

How are we to orient ourselves in our approach to this text? This essay aims to provide a few helpful pointers to readers, especially those who come to it for the first time. English and German readers alike may be...

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2 Strategies for a Possible Reading

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pp. 32-47

About a decade ago a book landed on our desks that married all the complicated features of a whale and a riddle: large and apparently offering no easy way for a hapless reader to see directly into its concerns (to look it in the eye as it were, for that, in some sense, is what one does...

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3 “Beyng-Historical Thinking” in Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy

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pp. 48-65

In the introductory section of Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning), Heidegger says that this title does not define nor does it attempt to speak about “some-thing.” The thinking of Contributions, he states, may only occur as “an attempt” (ein Versuch) to think the question of the...

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4 Poietic Saying

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pp. 66-80

When Contributions to Philosophy first appeared in 1989 after having been announced by Otto Pöggeler and Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann as Heidegger’s second major work after Being and Time, the critical response seemed rather more disappointed than excited. What presented...

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5 The Event of Enthinking the Event

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pp. 81-104

What sort of thinking is Heidegger trying to carry out in Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning)? Or should we rather say that the thinking at work here is carrying him—as a happening that sweeps him up in its force? Neither alternative seems right, for Contributions cultivates a way...

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6 Contributions to Philosophy and Enowning-Historical Thinking

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pp. 105-126

Anyone who sets out to interpret Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning)1 in a hermeneutically cogent manner should be guided in this task by two hermeneutic foresights. The first is the challenge to forego seeking access to Contributions

Part 2. Readings

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7 The Time of Contributions to Philosophy

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pp. 129-149

Chronologically reckoned, Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy (Of Ereignis)1 date from 1936–1938, an extremely rich and productive period of his work that is commonly regarded as marking a fundamental “turning” in his thought. To the most important works of around that

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8 Turnings in Essential Swaying and the Leap

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pp. 150-170

Within the context of the joining called “Leap” (der Sprung) in Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning), one of the first things that we can say is that, however the “turning” (die Kehre) in Heidegger’s thinking has been read/interpreted to this point, it now calls for a rethinking.

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9 Da-sein and the Leap of Being

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pp. 171-180

Martin Heidegger’s Beiträge zur Philosophie, or Contributions to Philosophy, is a sustained meditation on the problem of thinking about what had not previously been thought in metaphysics, or even in Heidegger’s earlier major work, Sein und Zeit (Being and Time). The matter in need...

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10 Grounders of the Abyss

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pp. 181-197

How is one even to read, much less to write about, a work that at the very outset disclaims being a work, at least of the style heretofore, and declares that all fundamental words have been used up and that the genuine relation to the word has been destroyed? What is to be said of a...

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11 Forgetfulness of God: Concerning the Center of Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy

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pp. 198-212

Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy seems strange and difficult to read in our times. This is attributable not only to its extremely concise, monumental, and lapidary style but to the difficulty of the thoughts articulated in it and often only sketched in. Nor is the difficulty attributable to...

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12 The Last God

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pp. 213-228

The primary focus of this essay is the brief but dense and important section of Contributions to Philosophy entitled “The Last God” (GA 65, 403– 17; CP, 285–93).1 Throughout the work we encounter the question of the last god, an oscillation between the singular and the plural, the relation...

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13 On “Be-ing”: The Last Part of Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning)

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pp. 229-246

In order to enter the last part of Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning) 1 entitled “Be-ing,” we must be clear about the following questions. Considering the structure of this work, which precisely reflects its hermeneutic-phenomenological thrust, in what sense can “Be-ing” be

Contributors

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pp. 247-250

Index

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pp. 251-255


E-ISBN-13: 9780253108395
E-ISBN-10: 025310839X
Print-ISBN-13: 9780253339461

Page Count: 264
Publication Year: 2001

Series Title: Studies in Continental Thought