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Metamorphoses

Translated by Rolfe Humphries. Ovid

Publication Year: 1960

"The Metamorphoses of Ovid offers to the modern world such a key to the literary and religious culture of the ancients that it becomes an important event when at last a good poet comes up with a translation into English verse." —John Crowe Ransom

"... a charming and expert English version, which is right in tone for the Metamorphoses." —Francis Fergusson

"This new Ovid, fresh and faithful, is right for our time and should help to restore a great reputation." —Mark Van Doren

The first and still the best modern verse translation of the Metamorphoses, Humphries’ version of Ovid’s masterpiece captures its wit, merriment, and sophistication.

Everyone will enjoy this first modern translation by an American poet of Ovid’s great work, the major treasury of classical mythology, which has perennially stimulated the minds of men. In this lively rendering there are no stock props of the pastoral and no literary landscaping, but real food on the table and sometimes real blood on the ground.

Not only is Ovid’s Metamorphoses a collection of all the myths of the time of the Roman poet as he knew them, but the book presents at the same time a series of love poems—about the loves of men, women, and the gods. There are also poems of hate, to give the proper shading to the narrative. And pervading all is the writer’s love for this earth, its people, its phenomena.

Using ten-beat, unrhymed lines in his translation, Rolfe Humphries shows a definite kinship for Ovid’s swift and colloquial language and Humphries’ whole poetic manner is in tune with the wit and sophistication of the Roman poet.

Published by: Indiana University Press

Cover

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p. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

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INTRODUCTION

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pp. v-ix

JUST A YEAR and a few days after Julius Caesar's fatal Ides of March, Publius Ovidius Nasa (we know him as Ovid, though W. S. Gilbert uses Naso, rhyming on say so, in one of the lyrics in Iolanthe) was born, on his brother's first birthday, in the town of Sulmo. That...

CONTENTS

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pp. xi-xiv

BOOK I

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pp. 3-27

BOOK II

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pp. 28-56

BOOK III

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pp. 57-80

BOOK IV

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pp. 81-106

BOOK V

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pp. 107-128

BOOK VI

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pp. 129-152

BOOK VII

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pp. 153-180

BOOK VIII

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pp. 181-208

BOOK IX

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pp. 209-233

BOOK X

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pp. 234-258

BOOK XI

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pp. 259-284

BOOK XII

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pp. 285-304

BOOK XIII

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pp. 305-337

BOOK XIV

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pp. 338-364

BOOK XV

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pp. 365-392

GLOSSARY AND INDEX

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pp. 393-401


E-ISBN-13: 9780253012418
Print-ISBN-13: 9780253337559

Page Count: 416
Publication Year: 1960