We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Fossils of the Carpathian Region

István Fozy and István Szente. Gareth Dyke, English Text Editor

Publication Year: 2013

István Fozy and István Szente provide a comprehensive review of the fossil record of the Carpathian Basin. Fossils of the Carpathian Region describes and illustrates the region’s fossils, recounts their history, and tells the stories of key people involved in paleontological research in the area. In addition to covering all the important fossils of this region, special attention is given to rare finds and complete skeletons. The region’s fossils range from tiny foraminifera to the Transylvanian dinosaurs, mastodons, and mammals. The book also gives nonspecialists the opportunity to gain a basic understanding of paleontology. Sidebars present brief biographies of important figures and explain how to collect, prepare, and interpret fossils.

Published by: Indiana University Press

Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (414.2 KB)
pp. 1-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (57.8 KB)
pp. vii-viii

Detailed Outline of the Text

pdf iconDownload PDF (51.2 KB)
pp. ix-x

List of Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF (701.1 KB)
pp. xi-xii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF (79.3 KB)
pp. xiii-xiv

Every day we stare in wonder at the gentle vibrations of nature, with perhaps a sentiment similar to the one above in mind. Then we just hurry on. Not so biologists! They seek out, name, and list even the tiniest living creatures and so far have “discovered” about 1.5 million species in the name of science. But this is merely the tip of the iceberg: ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.6 MB)
pp. xv-xvii

The authors express their sincere thanks to Professors András Galácz and László Kordos, who reviewed the Hungarian version of this manuscript and made useful suggestions that allowed us to improve it. The present English edition has benefited significantly from the comments of academician Barnabás Géczy, ...

read more

Introduction: Rocks, Fossils, Events, Ages

pdf iconDownload PDF (634.4 KB)
pp. xviii-xx

The Earth is more than four billion years old. Its history is documented by the rocks that form the Earth’s crust, which lies beneath our feet and can be structurally complex in some places. The time that has elapsed since the formation of our planet is infinitely long when compared to the age of the human lineage, and several methods make it possible for us to measure geological time. ...

Part One. The Paleozoic

pdf iconDownload PDF (388.5 KB)
pp. 1-25

read more

1. The Paleozoic

pdf iconDownload PDF (6.6 MB)
pp. 2-23

The Precambrian, which makes up about 85 percent of the history of the solid Earth, is represented by very sporadic fossil assemblages in the Carpathian region. A few poorly preserved organic-walled microfossils extracted from “crystalline” metamorphic rocks in a few areas including the Apuseni Mountains of Romania are thought to come from the latest Precambrian. ...

Part Two. The Mesozoic

read more

2. The Triassic

pdf iconDownload PDF (13.4 MB)
pp. 26-83

The approximately 186 million years that constitute the Mesozoic—also known as the secondary, or the middle, age in Earth history—document fundamental changes in the surface of our planet. By the end of the Cretaceous, the supercontinent Pangaea had been largely fragmented and the Tethys Ocean—which once separated the northern and southern continents—closed, ...

read more

3. The Jurassic

pdf iconDownload PDF (20.1 MB)
pp. 84-141

The middle part of the Mesozoic era, which lasted about 55 million years, is called the Jurassic (denoted with a J in geological abbreviations) after the Jura Mountains, which lie on the border between Switzerland and France and where surface rocks of this age are widespread. The Lower, Middle, and Upper Jurassic are also called Liassic, Dogger, and Malm, respectively. ...

read more

4. The Cretaceous

pdf iconDownload PDF (25.3 MB)
pp. 142-221

The last period of the Mesozoic era (denoted with a K in geological abbreviations), lasted for about 80 million years and was named after a special rock, “chalk” (from the German word Kreide), that formed in large amounts at this time. Although the specific Cretaceous “writing chalk” formed from the remains of masses of chrysophyte algae familiar across northwestern Europe ...

Part Three. The Cenozoic

read more

5. The Paleocene and Eocene

pdf iconDownload PDF (11.5 MB)
pp. 224-263

The Cenozoic, meaning “recent life,” is the next major era in the history of the Earth, and covers the period from 65 million years ago until the present. The name comes from two Greek words, which can be translated as “new animal life.” This is intended to indicate that the animal life of this era was similar to that seen today (in contrast to the Mesozoic and the much older Paleozoic). ...

read more

6. The Oligocene

pdf iconDownload PDF (6.3 MB)
pp. 264-285

The last epoch of the Paleogene, which spanned about 11 million years, is called the Oligocene. By this time, in the area of the present-day Carpathian Basin, the central basin of the Paratethys (already isolated from the rest of the world’s oceans) and continental terrane rising up above the sea can be found. ...

read more

7. The Early and Middle Miocene

pdf iconDownload PDF (14.8 MB)
pp. 286-337

The last 6 million years of the Miocene correspond with the Pannonian and Pontian ages across the area of the regressing Central Paratethys seaway. The likely already brackish Sarmatian Sea became completely separated from neighboring basins, and by the beginning of the Late Miocene a deep lake evolved in the area of the Carpathian Basin. ...

read more

8. The Late Miocene

pdf iconDownload PDF (7.8 MB)
pp. 338-365

The last 6 million years of the Miocene correspond with the Pannonian and Pontian ages across the area of the regressing Central Paratethys seaway. The likely already brackish Sarmatian Sea became completely separated from neighboring basins, and by the beginning of the Late Miocene a deep lake evolved in the area of the Carpathian Basin. ...

read more

9. The Pliocene

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.5 MB)
pp. 366-375

The last 3.5 million years of the Tertiary is called the Pliocene. By then, the area of the former Lake Pannon had been filled in completely and the Carpathian Basin became largely an alluvial plain. It is not easy to study terrestrial sediments since they contain only a few fossils, and the continuity of deposition sequences is difficult to demonstrate. ...

read more

10. The Pleistocene

pdf iconDownload PDF (9.9 MB)
pp. 376-413

The last 2.6 million years of Earth history following the Tertiary period is called the Quaternary. This period includes the time of the last big glaciation (the Pleistocene) as well as the geological present (the Holocene). The study of the wildlife of the Holocene forms the subject matter of botany, zoology, and anthropology. ...

Part Four. Museums and Collections

read more

11. Museums and Collections

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.9 MB)
pp. 416-428

There have always been people, even in very early times, who picked up and collected the eye-catching fossils that they found in the rocks. Prehistoric tombs all across the Carpathian Basin have yielded fossils, especially mollusks, worn as jewels by Early Man. Special finds, such as huge bones from Ice Age mammals, ended up in the collections of noblemen, pharmacists, and naturalists. ...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF (40.1 KB)
pp. 429-430

Although the Earth is more than 4 billion years old, humans are the first creatures to evolve the ability to recognize the past. Because of this unique ability, it seems important to us to search and to understand our environment and its past history. ...

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF (110.2 KB)
pp. 431-436

Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.2 MB)
pp. 437-440

References

pdf iconDownload PDF (313.5 KB)
pp. 441-464

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.9 MB)
pp. 465-484


E-ISBN-13: 9780253009876
Print-ISBN-13: 9780253009821

Page Count: 508
Illustrations: 446 color illus., 7 maps
Publication Year: 2013

Series Title: Life of the Past