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Butterflies of Indiana

A Field Guide

Jeffrey E. Belth

Publication Year: 2012

This field guide to Indiana’s rich butterfly fauna covers all 149 species of butterflies and their close relatives, the skippers. Over 500 color photographs illustrate the undersides and uppersides of most species and highlight the variations found among them, both seasonally and between males and females. For beginners and experts, Butterflies of Indiana also offers an introduction to the natural history of butterflies. The simple and intuitive design of this guide and its wealth of features make it a faithful companion for butterfly watchers, collectors, gardeners, birders, and naturalists.

Published by: Indiana University Press

Cover

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p. 1-1

Quick Key

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pp. 2-9

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 10-14

Contents

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pp. 15-17

The Plates

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pp. 1-18

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Swallowtails

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pp. 3-11

... A recently described species from the southern Appalachians (Pavulaan and Wright 2002, 2004) that may occur in southern Indiana. Eastern Tigers have several flights per year, including one in spring, from April to early May. Appalachian Tigers have only one, emerging in mid to late May as the first ...

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Whites and Sulphurs

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pp. 13-21

... Abundant; can be a pest on cabbages. Native to the Old World;  rst introduced to North America at Quebec City in 1860. From there it advanced across the continent: moving south it colonized Maine by 1865 and Massachusetts by 1870; ...

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Azures

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pp. 22-47

Once believed to be one species with a variety of color forms and multiple flights per year, the Spring Azure is now known to be a complex of several species, each with subtle differences in larval hosts, flight periods, and scale structure. Th e Spring Azure has a single, early spring flight and males with ...

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Milkweed Butterflies and Viceroy

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pp. 48-79

..  The Monarch is famous for its migration to Mexico (see pages 229- 230). Monarch larvae [137] are toxic to birds due to the cardenolides, or heart poisons, found in the milkweeds they eat.  ese toxins are transferred to the adult, rendering them poisonous as well. Adult Monarchs, along with Queens ...

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Spread-wing Skipper

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pp. 80-91

... Our most common spread-wing skipper, inhabiting a wide variety of habitats. Larvae [139] can often be found by looking for their leaf shelters, a pair of leaflets sewn together with silk. ...

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Grass Skippers

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pp. 92-127

... One of our most common and distinctive grass skippers. ...

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Moths

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pp. 128-131

On pages 129 and 131 is a very small sampling of the approximately 2,500 species of moths which occur in Indiana. Most moths are nocturnal, or active at night. Some however, are diurnal, or active during the day, just like butterflies. Shown here are a few of the species you might ...

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Immature Stages

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pp. 132-141

Note: Photographs are not to scale. Eggs are extremely small, usually 1/16" or less, and vary somewhat in size. Some eggs change color between the time they are deposited and the emergence of the larva. ...

Larval Hosts and Nectar Sources

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pp. 142-169

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The Basics

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pp. 171-189

I hope to answer many of your questions about butterflies in this book, but since your  first question will probably be Why butterflies? I will start there, before moving on to the what, where, when, and how. Why, you might ask, should you spend your precious time observing ...

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Beyond the Basics

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pp. 191-255

Within the 36,000 square miles of Indiana, 149 species of butterflies and skippers have been recorded; about 124 of these probably occur regularly. Crossing central Indiana by interstate highway, you might wonder how our state could possibly support so many butterfly species, since it appears to be entirely ...

Appendixes

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pp. 257-283

Glossary

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pp. 285-289

Bibliography

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pp. 291-307

Index

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pp. 309-323

About the Author

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p. 342-342

Quick Index

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pp. 343-345


E-ISBN-13: 9780253009630
Print-ISBN-13: 9780253009555

Page Count: 344
Publication Year: 2012

Series Title: Indiana Natural Science