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The Phenomenology of Religious Life

Martin Heidegger. Translated by Matthias Fritsch and Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei

Publication Year: 2010

The Phenomenology of Religious Life presents the text of Heidegger's important 1920–21 lectures on religion. The volume consists of the famous lecture course Introduction to the Phenomenology of Religion, a course on Augustine and Neoplatonism, and notes for a course on The Philosophical Foundations of Medieval Mysticism that was never delivered. Heidegger's engagements with Aristotle, St. Paul, Augustine, and Luther give readers a sense of what phenomenology would come to mean in the mature expression of his thought. Heidegger reveals an impressive display of theological knowledge, protecting Christian life experience from Greek philosophy and defending Paul against Nietzsche.

Published by: Indiana University Press

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Translators’ Foreword

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pp. xiii-xv

These lecture courses present particular difficulties for the translators, given that they were compiled from Heidegger’s notes and the notes of students in his lecture courses, rather than from material Heidegger prepared for . . .

Introduction to the Phenomenology of Religion: Winter Semester 1920–21

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p. 1-1

Part Two: Methodological Introduction Philosophy, Factical Life Experience, and the Phenomenology of Religion

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Chapter One: The Formation of Philosophical Concepts and Factical Life Experience

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pp. 3-13

It is necessary to determine the meaning of words of the lecture’s announcement preliminarily. This necessity is grounded in the peculiarity of philosophical concepts. In the specific scientific disciplines, concepts are . . .

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Chapter Two: Current Tendencies of the Philosophy of Religion

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pp. 14-21

The interest in the philosophy of religion is currently increasing. Even women write philosophies of religion and philosophers who wish to be taken seriously welcome them as the most important appearances in decades! . . .

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Chapter Three: The Phenomenon of the Historical

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pp. 22-37

We want now to attempt to set forth a core phenomenon that reigns through the connections of meaning of the three words in the title (“Introduction to the Phenomenology of Religion”). This core phenomenon is the . . .

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Chapter Four: Formalization and Formal Indication

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pp. 38-45

We will name the methodical use of a sense that becomes a guiding one for phenomenological explication, a “formal indication.” The phenomena will be examined according to what the formally indicative sense carries . . .

Part Two: Phenomenological Explication of Concrete Religious Phenomena in Connection with the Letters of Paul

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Chapter One: Phenomenological Interpretation of the Letters to the Galatians

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pp. 47-51

In the following, we do not intend to give a dogmatic or theological-exegetical interpretation, nor a historical study or a religious meditation, but only guidance for phenomenological understanding. Characteristic of the . . .

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Chapter Two: Task and Object of the Philosophy of Religion

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pp. 52-60

In which way are we to consider, for the philosophy of religion, that which we brought to attention, in an entirely primitive way, through a reading of the letter to the Galatians? That is to be decided only out of the leading aim of . . .

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Chapter Three: Phenomenological Explication of the First Letter to the Thessalonians

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pp. 61-74

The first letter to the Thessalonians was written in the year 53 a.d. (thus twenty years after the crucifixion); it is the earliest document of the New Testament. Its authenticity is now no longer doubted. We ask, according . . .

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Chapter Four: The Second Letter to the Thessalonians

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pp. 75-82

In his exegesis of both letters to the Thessalonians, the theologian Schmidt seeks to construct an opposition between the first and the second.1 According to the second letter, the paroysi¬a is preceded by the arrival of the . . .

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Chapter Five: Characteristics of Early Christian Life Experience

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pp. 83-89

On the object of proclamation: we must differentiate between the proclamation of the synoptics and that of Paul. In the synoptic gospels, Jesus announces . . .

Appendix: Notes and Sketches on the Lecture

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pp. 90-111

Augustine and Neo-Plationism: Summer Semester 1921

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pp. 113-114

Introductory Part: Interpretations of Augustine

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pp. 115-125

Main Part: Phenomenological Interpretation of Confessions; Book X

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pp. 127-184

Appendix I: Notes and Sketches for the Lecture Course

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pp. 185-202

Appendix II: Supplements from the Notes of Oskar Becker

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pp. 203-227

The Philosophical Foundations of Medieval Mysticism: [Outlines and Sketches for a Lecture, Not Held, 1918–1919]

The Philosophical Foundations of Medieval Mysticism

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pp. 229-254

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Afterword of the Editors of the Lecture Course Winter Semester 1920–21

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pp. 255-258

Martin Heidegger held the lecture course “Introduction to the Phenomenology of Religion” as a private lecturer in the winter semester 1920–1921 at the University of Freiburg. According to the schedule of courses, it was held . .

Afterword of the Editor of the Lecture Course Summer Semester 1921 and of the Outlines and Sketches 1918–19

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pp. 259-264

Glossary of Key Terms

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pp. 265-266


E-ISBN-13: 9780253004499
Print-ISBN-13: 9780253342485

Page Count: 288
Publication Year: 2010

Series Title: Studies in Continental Thought