We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Balkan Breakthrough

The Battle of Dobro Pole 1918

Richard C. Hall

Publication Year: 2010

With the transfer of German units to the western front in the spring of 1918, the position of the Central Powers on the Macedonian front worsened. Materiel became scarce and morale among the Bulgarian forces deteriorated. The Entente Command perceived in Macedonia an excellent opportunity to apply additional pressure to the Germans, who were already retreating on the western front. In September, Entente forces undertook an offensive directed primarily at Bulgarian defenses at Dobro Pole. Balkan Breakthrough tells the story of that battle and its consequences. Dobro Pole was the catalyst for the collapse of the Central Powers and the Entente victory in southeastern Europe -- a defeat that helped persuade the German military leadership that the war was lost. While decisive in ending World War I in the region, the battle did not resolve the underlying national issues there.

Published by: Indiana University Press

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (307.7 KB)
pp. v-

List of Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF (304.8 KB)
pp. vii-

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (305.2 KB)
pp. ix-

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (320.7 KB)
pp. xi-xv

The mountainous southeastern corner of Europe is bordered on three sides by substantial bodies of water. The Adriatic Sea in the west, the Black Sea in the east, and the Aegean or White Sea in the south form this region into the peninsula. This entire region is often called the Balkan Peninsula, after the Turkish name for the central mountain range in Bulgaria. Mountains throughout much of the region hinder advancement overland. River...

Note on Transliteration

pdf iconDownload PDF (361.6 KB)
pp. xvii-

read more

1. Balkan Politics

pdf iconDownload PDF (12.9 MB)
pp. 1-12

By the third quarter of the nineteenth century three national states had emerged in southeastern Europe from the non-national Ottoman Empire. These were Greece, Romania, and Serbia. All three sought to emulate the political and economic success of national states in western Europe. From the onset of their establishment none of these small southeastern European states considered their frontiers to be permanent. All sought to...

read more

2. Balkan Wars

pdf iconDownload PDF (26.7 MB)
pp. 13-35

By the third quarter of the nineteenth century three national states had emerged in southeastern Europe from the non-national Ottoman Empire. These were Greece, Romania, and Serbia. All three sought to emulate the political and economic success of national states in western Europe. From the onset of their establishment none of these small southeastern European states considered their frontiers to be permanent. All sought to...

read more

3. The Establishment of the Macedonian Front

pdf iconDownload PDF (13.1 MB)
pp. 36-57

The defense of Serbia in 1914 was a rare early success for the Entente. Despite having deflected three Austro-Hungarian invasions, Serbia remained vulnerable to additional attacks from the Central Powers. Manpower and resources, depleted in the fighting in 1912–13, had scarcely recovered from the combats against Austria-Hungary. Meanwhile typhus and cholera, which originally had developed during the fighting in 1912 and had...

read more

4. Development of the Macedonian Front

pdf iconDownload PDF (13.0 MB)
pp. 58-80

The formation of the Macedonian Front, like that of the Western and Eastern Fronts, during the First World War, was accidental. Neither the Central Powers nor the Entente had anticipated establishing a line of conflict along the Greek frontier with Bulgaria and Serbian Macedonia. Both maintained forces along this front as a means of preventing the other side from employing...

read more

5. The Lull

pdf iconDownload PDF (13.0 MB)
pp. 81-99

For the Bulgarians, the results of the 1916 campaign in Macedonia were decidedly mixed. They had advanced in eastern Macedonia, and they had, despite considerable losses in territory and manpower, managed to hold on against a strong Entente offensive in central Macedonia. Their position north of Bitola was less than ideal. The Entente forces were well...

read more

6. The Erosion of the Bulgarian Army

pdf iconDownload PDF (26.9 MB)
pp. 100-125

At the beginning of the war Bulgarian morale was largely positive. While the Bulgarians were not enthusiastic to be at war again so soon after the Balkan Wars, they were grimly determined to rectify the injustices they perceived to be the consequence of the 1913 Treaty of Bucharest. Nevertheless, after a year of military ...

read more

7. Breakthrough

pdf iconDownload PDF (12.9 MB)
pp. 127-145

By the end of the summer of 1918, conditions on the Macedonian Front had worsened considerably for the Central Powers. The great influenza epidemic had caused some physical and morale problems among the Bulgarian soldiers.1 Much to the dismay of the Bulgarian command, the Germans had withdrawn considerable numbers of troops and weapons to use...

read more

8. Collapse

pdf iconDownload PDF (13.0 MB)
pp. 146-167

While the fighting raged at Doiran, to the west French and Serbian forces continued to advance through the gap in the Bulgarian lines opened at Dobro Pole. The Serbian First Army captured bridges over the Cherna at Rasim Bey and established positions on the other side of the river on 18 September. This placed the Serbian First Army in position to threaten the...

read more

9. Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF (12.9 MB)
pp. 168-175

The First World War continued the cycle of war that had begun in southeastern Europe as the inhabitants of the region attempted to form national states on the western European model. The fighting during this cycle grew to include not only the peoples of southeastern Europe themselves...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF (563.1 KB)
pp. 177-204

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF (471.4 KB)
pp. 205-212

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (320.4 KB)
pp. 213-216


E-ISBN-13: 9780253004116
E-ISBN-10: 025300411X
Print-ISBN-13: 9780253354525

Page Count: 240
Illustrations: 17 b&w illus., 6 maps
Publication Year: 2010

Series Title: Twentieth-Century Battles