Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

Illustrations

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pp. viii-viii

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Preface

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pp. xi-xv

There was nothing extraordinary about how I came upon Francis R. Stebbins’s Florida adventures. It happened in the usual way. I was looking for references to nineteenth-century Florida, and they figuratively reached out and grabbed me. At the time I was working through the Library of Michigan’s microfilm collection of Michigan newspapers that I had previously identified as a treasure trove of contemporary writing about postbellum Florida. The...

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Prologue

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pp. xvi-xxvi

One early March day in 1878 two travelers from Adrian, Michigan, saw their plans to visit Cuba dashed as they stood before a steamship company ticket window in New Orleans. It was the first trip south for Francis R. Stebbins and Frank W. Clay, and before leaving home they had widely broadcast their intention to visit strife-ridden Cuba. They were keenly disappointed to learn American citizens were required to have passports to go to the Spanish colony...

1. Indian River Longings

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pp. 1-3

2. 1878 From Far Florida

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pp. 4-17

3. 1879 Indian River, Florida

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pp. 18-41

4. 1880 Our Florida Letter

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pp. 42-60

5. 1881 On the Bounding Billows

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pp. 61-71

6. 1882 Among the Mangroves

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pp. 72-89

7. 1883 Life on the Lagoons

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pp. 90-102

8. 1884 Where Summer Lives

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pp. 103-117

9. 1885 Northerners in the South

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pp. 118-129

10. 1886 Florida’s Freeze Up

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pp. 130-139

11. 1888 Roving on Indian River

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pp. 140-155

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Epilogue

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pp. 156-159

Francis R. Stebbins’s shock and grief at the passing of his good friend and neighbor Alanson Worden were profound. After escorting the body home, Stebbins assisted Worden’s widow in settling his friend’s estate.1 Performing this role under such circumstances would have seemed slight penance for luring his friend away from family and home to die in a faraway place. Stebbins’s deep remorse for his part in Worden’s death was surely intense. His own dread of expiring alone in a strange land, often expressed in his Florida papers, must...

Notes

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pp. 161-194

Bibliography

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pp. 195-208

Index

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pp. 209-220