Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

In this book I look at the phenomenon of the emigration of Italian men to the United States prior to the First World War from the perspective of the participants in the event, the migrants themselves. The focus is restricted to the greenhorn years-the initial encounter with the immigrant status. The first exposure to the host country was the most trying ...

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1. Leaving Italy

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pp. 3-36

To understand why emigration from Italy commenced and grew stead ily in volume, one must consider more than the broad societal forces that set the flow in motion. Time and again over the years, it was a combination of individual forces that triggered the decision to emigrate. Poverty, or relative deprivation, does not by itself create a suffi ...

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2. Landing in New York

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pp. 37-60

In mid-nineteenth-century America, although there were state laws regulating immigration, the procedure for admitting the newcomers arriving in port cities on the east coast consisted of little more than a head count. 2 New York's processing center was known as the Barge Office. It was located on the Battery, at the tip of Manhattan, where an ...

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3. Working in America

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pp. 61-116

"The Americans," wrote Napoleone Colajanni in 1909, "consider the Italians as unclean, small foreigners who play the accordion, operate fruit stands, sweep the streets, work in the mines or tunnels, on the railroad or as bricklayers." 2 Because the Italians were restricted to "immigrant work" and a few other jobs that they came to monopolize...

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4. Living in America

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pp. 117-158

In the 1870S the Italian community in lower Manhattan began to spread beyond lower Mulberry Street. The Italians took over Hester and Mott Streets from the Irish, gradually replaced them on Baxter Street, and spilled over into upper Mulberry. By 1880 there were...

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5. Italglish: The Immigrant Idiom

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pp. 159-188

One of the most fascinating adjustments that Italian newcomers made to American society was the way they adapted their language. The immigrants developed an idiom, simply constructed and quickly learned by any greenhorn within a few weeks, that proved to be an effective...

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6. Repatriation

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pp. 189-202

Italians may have been unique among European immigrants in their rate of return to their homeland. Some of these repatriates went home permanently; either they had planned to do so, or they had become disillusioned with America. Others, after a period of months or years...

Notes

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pp. 203-220

Sources and Further Reading

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pp. 221-230

Index

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pp. 231-234