Cover

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-xii

The title I've chosen for this book is neither original1 nor, strictly speaking, adequately descriptive of what the reader will find here. Nonetheless, I've chosen Red Matters because red has not much mattered as yet, not in the aura of the postcolonial, gender and race, borderlands, cultural, or subaltern studies.

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

I come now to the pleasant task of thanking those who, in many and various ways, have sustained my work and in a variety of ways have contributed to the making of this book. I've chosen to dedicate specific chapters to specific persons rather than to offer a dedication to the book as a whole. Their names, and those of other friends, colleagues, and co-...

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1. Nationalism, Indigenism, Cosmopolitanism: Three Perspectives on Native American Literatures

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pp. 1-23

Criticism of Native American literatures today proceeds from one or another of the critical perspectives I call nationalist, indigenist, and cosmopolitan. The nationalist and indigenist positions sometimes overlap, and both nationalists and indigenists tend to see themselves as apart from and in opposition to the cosmopolitans. Nonetheless, as I will try to show,...

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2. On the Translation of Native American Song and Story: A Theorized History

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pp. 24-47

This chapter reprints an essay published ten years ago in Brian Swann's edited volume On the Translation of Native American Literatures. After a good deal of reflection, I decided to leave it in its original form with only this prefatory note to serve as an explanation of that decision. As the preceding chapter should have made clear, translation in the figurative mode...

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3. America's Histories

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pp. 48-75

This chapter's title means to point to the fact that the history of America most of us know is not the only history of America. The indigenous oral tradition, for example, abounds with narratives that the contemporary Wyandot historian Clifford Trafzer calls, "the first history of the Americas" (474). This is "history," Trafzer notes, "in the native sense of...

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4. From "Half-Blood" to "Mixedblood": Cogewea and the "Discourse of Indian Blood"

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pp. 76-97

Published in 1927, and until recently thought the "first" novel by a Native American woman,2 Mourning Dove's Cogewea: The Half-Blood was paid little critical attention until 1978, when Charles Larson commented upon it in an appendix to his American Indian Fiction in regard to the issue of dual authorship. Mourning Dove —or Hum-ishu-ma, also known as Christine Haines and Christine or Chrystal Quintasket — this is to say, had completed a first draft of the novel in the years 1912-14, but, after meeting Lucullus Virgil McWhorter...

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5. The "Rage Stage": Contextualizing Sherman Alexie's Indian Killer

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pp. 98-122

Sherman Alexie's Indian Killer (1996) begins in the "winter" of 1968-69,1 in the delivery room of "An Indian Health Service hospital," on "this reservation or that reservation. Any reservation, a particular reservation" (3). There a dark-skinned boy is born to a fourteen-year-old Indian2 woman who has apparently agreed to give him up for adoption. The transfer of the infant to his adoptive parents is violent...

Notes

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pp. 123-142

Bibliography

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pp. 143-160

Index

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pp. 161-167