Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

I wish to express my appreciation here for support from the Canadian Studies Grant Program in the United States for a Senior Fellowship which helped defray the cost of research in Washington, Ottawa and London. Additional funding for my research was supplied by the All-University Research Initiation fund of Michigan State University. ...

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A Note on Terminology

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pp. 1-2

The term "Canada" is used throughout this book even though the Dominion of Canada was established only in 1867. From 1608 to 1760, Canada was a French colony. Following the conquest by Britain in the Seven Years' War and the migration of English speaking settlers (most of them loyalists fleeing the American revolution) into the region west of the Ottawa River in ...

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I. Introduction

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pp. 3-22

Canada is an odd case in the scholarly field of United States foreign relations because much more has been written by the Canadian side than the American. A basic characteristic of the U.S. foreign relations field in recent years has been the shift from American-centered research and interpretations to multiple perspective approaches. Research in the foreign country or countries, ...

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II. “Tendencies to Bad Neighborhood” 1783-1854

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pp. 23-60

The United States and Canada began as bad neighbors. During the first seventy or so years after independence, the American response to Canada was characterized by suspicion and hostility. The War of 1812 (during which William Hull, Governor of Michigan Territory and Brigadier General in the Army of the Northwest, led an invasion and declared Upper Canada to be conquered by the United States) was the most dramatic manifestation of the tension and distrust between the two countries. ...

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III. “A Second Empire” 1854-1892

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pp. 61-100

In the 1840s, Americans had anticipated the disintegration of the British Empire in North America. The end of the old colonial trading system, the advent of responsible government, and the reduction of the garrisons appeared as steps toward independence for the British North American colonies. Yet the next fifty years thoroughly undermined these American hopes. ...

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IV. “Broad Questions of National Policy” 1892-1911

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pp. 101-126

In 1892, the Republican administration led by Harrison and Blaine refused to consider the possibility of reciprocity with Canada; in 1911, a Republican administration led by President Howard Taft and Secretary of State Philander C. Knox worked energetically to promote a reciprocal trade agreement with Canada. In 1892, Harrison and Blaine concluded that Canada ...

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V. “An Object of American Foreign Policy since the Founding of the Republic” 1911-1988

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pp. 127-174

The Taft administration believed it had offered "an excellent bargain" to Canada in 1911. Even the Canadian Governor-General recognized the generosity of the American position. "The arrangement," Grey wrote to Bryce, "which secures a free entry into a market of 90 million people for the natural produce of Canada while it secures the home market for Canadian manufacturers is a good one."1 ...

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VI. Assessment

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pp. 175-206

The questions to be answered in this concluding chapter remain those posed at the outset. Are there any permanent features or recurring patterns in the American response to Canada? Is it possible to identify an American policy toward Canada and, in particular, does it make sense to think in terms of an American imperialism directed against Canada? ...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 207-212

Index

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pp. 213-220