Cover

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Title Page

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Contents

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p. v

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Foreword

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pp. vii-viii

How are America’s major cities faring? And what of the regions surrounding them? Do federal, state, and local policies work in tandem with market forces or against reasonable development? Those are among the core questions that the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program addresses all the time—and that this book goes a long way toward answering. Sunbelt/Frostbelt profiles five metropolitan areas...

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

This volume began with a series of meetings involving urban research teams from several metropolitan areas, including the five represented in the volume. The meetings were organized by the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program (then called the Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy), directed by Bruce Katz. Amy Liu and Robert Puentes played major roles...

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Chapter 1: Metropolitan Development: Patterns, Problems, Causes, Policy Proposals

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pp. 1-25

The literature on urban development of the past decade (since about the mid-1990s) has been characterized by the introduction of two concepts: “the New Metropolitanism” and “the New Urbanism.” A recent essay refers to the new metropolitanism as a “paradigm shift."1 Although the term takes on many different meanings, its principal components are...

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Chapter 2: Chicago: Metropolitan Decentralization

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pp. 26-54

Large enough to intensely manifest big-city problems, but not so different as to suggest a lack of generalizability, Chicago is the urban laboratory par excellence. A focus on this Midwest giant makes particularly good sense in a consideration of sprawl. Given its rising per capita incomes, flat geography, and long-standing racial tensions, Chicago provides a likely setting for sprawl. And the...

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Chapter 3: Los Angeles: Region by Design

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pp. 55-109

How did public policies shape America’s most iconoclastic city-region . . . or did they? Los Angeles is often viewed as the grand exception in American urbanism—the city that “breaks the rules.” Diverse, fragmented, polarized, and ungovernable, a metropolis without geographic center or unifying civic culture, southern California is often described as having grown without benefit of planning or policy...

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Chapter 4: Philadelphia: Spatial Economic Disparities

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pp. 110-139

Economic development and growth have varied widely across jurisdictions within the Philadelphia metropolitan area. The same is true for social conditions across the region. This is likely to make forging metropolitan solutions to urban and regional problems difficult, because they typically require a political consensus that itself is hard to establish in such circumstances. There is ...

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Chapter 5. Phoenix: Dealing with Fast Growth

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pp. 140-181

Phoenix is often viewed as the quintessential Sunbelt metropolis: young, fast-growing, auto-centered, and sprawling. While some facets of the stereotype are accurate, the complete picture of metropolitan Phoenix is more complex. In some notable ways, metropolitan Phoenix’s story is one of success. For example, in comparison with other urban regions...

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Chapter 6. Pittsburgh: Economic Restructuring and Regional Development Patterns, 1880-2000

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pp. 182-217

The physical development pattern of most regions was transformed dramatically during the second half of the twentieth century as commercial, industrial, and residential development moved away from central cities and economic activity shifted from manufacturing to services. Over time, new highways, beltways, and other public infrastructure...

Contributors

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pp. 219-220

Index

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pp. 221-232

Maps

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pp. 235-250