Cover

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Frontmatter

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Title Page

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p. iii

Copyright Page

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p. iv

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Foreword

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pp. vii-xi

“Integration” has a powerful and positive resonance in the vocabulary of American policy and politics. The word is associated with progress, fairness, mutual benefit, good governance, and a healthy community. But for some, it’s been a fighting word, associated with take-no-prisoners debate and even violence. That’s because what one person, or one part of the community, advocates as a welcome step, ...

Table of Contents

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p. xiii

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Chapter 1: Introduction

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pp. 1-30

When it came into force on January 1, 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) joined the economic futures of Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Clearly both Canada and Mexico—given their geography and markets—had been integrating with the United States well before NAFTA took effect. Indeed, the United States ...

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Chapter 2: Canada in North America

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pp. 31-72

Even before Confederation, Canadians’ views of themselves were shaped and defined by their relationship with their southern neighbors. Canada was born of the fear that, without banding together, the remaining colonies of British North America would inexorably be absorbed by the stronger and more ...

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Chapter 3: Integrating North America

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pp. 73-86

When Mexican president-elect Vicente Fox traveled to the United States and Canada shortly after his unprecedented victory at the polls in July 2000, he brought with him a courageous proposal to the other two members of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA): After seven years under a free trade agreement, it was time to set the ...

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Chapter 4: NAFTA is not Enough

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pp. 87-118

More than four hundred million people in 2002 live in the United States, Mexico, and Canada, but few, if any, think of themselves as residents of “North America.” The term has described the continent’s geography but not its people. The governments of these three countries have devoted so much energy to declaring their differences that they have given ...

Contributors

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pp. 119-120

Index

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pp. 121-130