Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vii

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Foreword / Maureen Ursenbach Beecher

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pp. ix-x

"By the most open definition, whatever a woman writes in the course of her life might be considered a life writing: a note, a letter, a recipe book, her personal phone directory, a diary or journal, her laundry list, a personal essay, an autobiography, memoir, or reminiscence. Each has its own way of reflecting her life experience, revealing her character to whoever ..."

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Acknowledgments

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p. xi

"It was one thing for Louisa Barnes Pratt to produce her journals. It was another remarkable happening to have them preserved and made available. After Louisa, great credit goes to those who protected and preserved her journals, letters, poems, and essays. They were Ellen S. Pratt McGary, Ida Mae Wrathall, Ida Hunt Udall, Nettie Hunt Rencher, Lois ..."

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xxiv

"Of Mormon pioneer women known to me, there is not another that had quite the variety of experiences that Louisa Barnes Pratt had. A typical Mormon at first, she headed for Missouri after her conversion; built a cottage in Nauvoo after sending her husband on a mission to the other side of the earth, which left her without support and to rear four daughters; ..."

Dramatis Personae

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pp. xxv-xxvi

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Author’s Preface

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pp. xxvii-xxviii

"Being now in my fiftieth year and having passed a life of deep experience in the changes and fortunes to which life's nature is always liable, and being in circumstances that afford me much leisure, I have resolved to make a record of the leading incidents of a career in a world where good and ill have been always contained. The reason which urges me ..."

I. On Joining the Mormons: Youth to Arrival in Salt Lake Valley, September 1848

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1. Youth: Memoirs, 1802 to September 1825

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pp. 3-20

"I was born in the State of Mass. Franklin Co. town of Warwick. My parents, whose names [were] Willard and Dolly Barnes, were honest intelligent people. And though not from the wealthier ranks of society, they were in possession of a farm with many of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. They were of honorable origin, my grandfather Barnes, ..."

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2. Independent Young Woman: Memoirs, September 1825 to April 1831

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pp. 21-36

"About this time my uncle and aunt Baker contemplated a visit to Massachusetts, the place of my birth, where I had long desired to go. My mother having three daughters younger than myself at home, seemed willing I should go to visit her relatives, believing it would be an advantage to me in the way of improving my mind and manners. My uncle ..."

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3. The Years at Ripley, New York: Memoirs, April 1831 to June 1838

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pp. 37-56

"We took passage on the Steamer Phoenix, across Lake Champlain. I had never before been on a steamboat. The motion affected me some, but did not prostrate me as it did the other lady passangers. I went into my berth, and should have slept soundly had it not been for the wailings of the women and children. From Plattsburg we embarked on a fine packet boat, ..."

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4. From Ripley, New York, to Nauvoo, Illinois: Memoirs, October 1838 to Fall 1841

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pp. 57-63

"From that time I had never a doubt. My soul was full of peace and joy. My brother made an agreement with our parents, a sister and brother, that when he had disposed of his property in Chatauque Co. N.Y he would return to Canada, sell the Homestead, and assist in moving them with us to the centre stake of Zion in Jackson Co., Missouri. Thither did our ..."

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5. Nauvoo, Missionary Widow: Memoirs, Fall 1841 to Spring 1846

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pp. 64-77

"We put up with an acquaintance living near the grove, staid a few days, then hired a house for five dollars per month. In the best room was twenty bushels of corn which could not be removed for several days. I kept my goods packed, did the best I could with little room. It mattered not to me so long as I had accomplished my desires, and was safely ..."

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6. In the Exodus from Nauvoo to Salt Lake Valley: Memoirs, Spring 1846 to September 1848

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pp. 78-94

"At length the time came that we must leave our beloved Temple, Our City, and our homes. I forbear to dwell upon the solemn dread which took possession of my mind. Almon Babbit called to see me. I asked him if he could divine the reason why those who had sent my husband to the ends of the earth did not call to inquire, whether I could prepare myself ..."

II. On a Mormon Mission to Tahiti: Salt Lake Valley, September 1848 to April 1850; The Mission to the Society Islands, April 1850 to July 1852

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7. In Salt Lake Valley: Memoirs, September 1848 to April 1850

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pp. 97-109

"[While some exiled Saints scattered into the frontier population, three movements emerged to help unify the Mormon people and get them to their destined Zion: (1) the Pioneer Company led by Brigham Young; (2) the passengers on the ship Brooklyn, led by Samuel Brannan; and (3) the Mormon Battalion led by U.S. ..."

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8. Mission Begun, Salt Lake City to Sacramento: Memoirs, 7 May 1850 to July 1850

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pp. 110-117

"After exchanging tears and adieus, six wagons started on, 24 persons in all, expecting to overtake a small company at Bear River.1 We found the Weber very high, the water running over the middle of the bridge. We got safely over, called at Brown's Fort, where dinner was prepared for us, by a good sister, whose name is Abigail Abbot, a neighbor in Nauvoo. She ..."

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9. From San Francisco to Tubuai: Journal A, Part 1, 26 July 1850 to January 1851

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pp. 118-130

"July 26th [1850] Pitched our tents on the bank of the river where we unloaded our waggons, and the man who had purchased them took them away. I saw myoid waggon go, which for four years had been a sleeping room for the children: it was the last piece of property that remained of ..."

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10. The Island Tubuai: A Missionary Family I: Journal A, Part 2, January to 18 September 1851

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pp. 131-146

"A few days were spent in conversation, when the work on the vessel was renewed. Mr P engaged in making the sails. Nearly all his time was spent at Mahu except the sabbaths; but now that we knew where he was and what he was doing, we felt quite reconciled to do without him."

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11. The Island Tubuai: A Missionary Family II: Memoirs, 15 September 1851 to 1 February 1852

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pp. 147-162

"[September 1851] 22nd day. The equinoctial storm occurred which continued for a week. We are expecting to hear of terrible disasters at sea. Glad our hearts are to see the smiling face of the old king of day once more. In this far off world a dark, dismal day seems intolerable. Sunshine and flowers are our congenial companions."

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12. The Islands Tubuai and Tahiti: A Missionary Family III: Memoirs, February 1852 to 6 April 1852

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pp. 163-179

"In the evening had a walk by moonlight. Nothing could exceed the grandeur of the scenery. The moon was near the full, the sky clear as amber. The tall cocoanuts were waving their branches over our heads. Immediately before us the proud waves of the Pacifick were rolling in awful majesty. A strong breeze was blowing to waft the ship that had ..."

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13. Retreat and The Voyage Home: Journal B, Part 1, 15 April 1852 to 4 July 1852

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pp. 180-192

"15th day [April 1852]. Took possession of a dwelling house, for which we are to pay twenty dollars per month, rent; the payment divided between four families. We are all quite comfortable here. One large sitting room I have the control of; it has five large windows in venetian Style; not one pane of glass; they make it delightfully cool. Our cook house is placed at a ..."

III. On Early California: The San Bernardino Experience 1852 to 1857; The Break-up at San Bernardino, January 1858

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14. San Francisco and San Jose: Journal B, Part 2, 4 July 1852 to 4 December 1852

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pp. 195-206

"[The veteran missionaries landed in San Francisco penniless in 1852. 'We had nothing,' wrote Louisa, 'all the earnings of our early lives spent' on Church moves and the mission. 'Not an article to keep house with.' They found the community of Saints depleted and scattered, but hospitable and generous, answering Louisa's prayers. Fortunately the times were good. The Gold Rush was on. The mines and ..."

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15. San Bernardino I: Memoirs, December 1852 to April 1856

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pp. 207-223

"Mr. Pratt came down from San Hosa, and we prepared to go on board the Freemont, Capt Erskine. We sent our goods to the steamer, the day previous staid on shore to meet our friends again. Mr. Crisman was present, said everything encouraging about the settlement in San Bernadino. It cheered our hearts and made us feel stronger. On Monday A.M. in Dec. ..."

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16. San Bernardino II: Memoirs, 14 April 1856 to 8 February 1857

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pp. 224-242

"Mr. Pratt was appointed to go again to the island. I did not feel reconciled, but I bore it as patiently as I could. Brothers Rich and Cox came to give him a parting blessing. It was great and good! They also gave me one. Said I should be blessed in the absence of my companion, with the necessaries and comforts of life, that my mind should be buoyed up under..."

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17. San Bernardino III: Memoirs, February 1857 to January 1858

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pp. 243-260

"In an adjoining Co, there were horrible things told of the robbers. One, a mexican by birth had his head cut off, carried about and exhibited. I would not sanction such a deed. The time came to make a garden. I must oversee it, and do what I could. I hired an Indian to spade up my ground. I sewed the seeds and watered it. Mr. Pratt was then in San Francisco, and I could not learn ..."

IV. On Pioneer Living in Beaver: Beaver, Utah Territory 1858 to 1880

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18. Fateful Move: San Bernardino to Beaver, Utah: Memoirs, January 1858 to January 1859

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pp. 263-276

"[For the hundreds of Saints now leaving San Bernardino, the break-up was a crisis of major magnitude. Families sacrificed years of hard labor and money invested in homes and fields and turned their backs on their dreams of the good life in California, ready to begin all over again, to build new homes and villages, to reclaim the desert. There had been forced moves before; here was repeated the whole ..."

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19. Settling in at Beaver: Memoirs, January 1859 to July 1860

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pp. 277-291

"Jan 4th ... 59. Nearly a year had passed since we left Cal to return to Utah. I was settled in a house of my own, and felt comparatively reconciled. It was announced that our visiting friends were to start early in the morning to return to their home. I felt agitated, not knowing when I might see them again; and more so because the dear child would be ..."

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20. Beaver and a Trip to California: Memoirs, July 1860 to December 1864

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pp. 292-304

"Ann L. and Ephraim had raised a crop of vegetables in the garden; had taken care of the cows and been faithful in all that was entrusted to them. News came from my daughter Lois H. who had gone back to Cal. that she had another daughter born to her. I could have rejoiced, had she been near me, but she was far away, an intolerable journey between us; I had no prospect of seeing her or her child, in any definite length of time. ..."

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21. Beaver and Family: Memoirs, January 1865 to December 1869

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pp. 305-319

"In the year 65, I went the second time to S. Lake City, taking with me my grandaughter Ida Frances, and my Island boy, then able to drive the team. Ida F. was eight years old. She had yellow glossy hair, of unusual dimension for one of her age. She was self possessed and amiable, neither bashful or rude; always obliging. If she was invited to sing she ..."

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22. A Railroad Trip to East Canada: Memoirs, Winter 1870–71 to December 1871

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pp. 320-339

"Ann L. soon after the death of her last one, left the unhealthy location and returned to town. Ellen went to Ogden to recover the property awarded her by the court when her separation from her husband took place. She there encountered him, though she did not meet his wife. Their meeting, as she told me, was of a painful nature. To her he ..."

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23. A Variety of Activities: Memoirs, December 1871 to December 1875

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pp. 340-356

"There was joy in the house among the children. I had presents for them all. Maple sugar was a luxury that had never seen or tasted. Many grown persons raised in this western world had never seen the article. The fact of its being brought so far, and some of it made from the same trees which yielded sweet water in my early childhood, and from them I had ..."

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24. Sunset Years at Home in Beaver: Memoirs, December 1875 to August 1880

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pp. 357-379

"[The character of Beaver as a community changed significantly during the 1870s, a result of the discovery in 1870 of rich mineral deposits in the west mountains. A great number of miners came into the area. Friction developed between them and the original settlers. Both parties asked for federal troops; four companies of soldiers came in 1872. Fort Cameron was garrisoned between 1874 and 1883. Minersville ..."

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Sources

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pp. 380-383

"The biographer of Louisa Barnes Pratt is blessed with a wealth of original documents by primary witnesses. The central actors in this drama were intelligent and literate. They wrote letters and maintained personal records."

Notes

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pp. 384-401

Literature Cited

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pp. 402-404

Index

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pp. 405-420