Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. vi-vii

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

In editing this collection, which relies almost entirely on the talents of others, I have incurred more debts than I could ever discharge. My greatest debt, of course, is to Terry Tempest Williams herself. Her extraordinary talent made this book possible, and her graciousness at every step of the process ...

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A Life Engaged: A Critical Introduction

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pp. 1-12

Critics describe Terry Tempest Williams as a paradox. In the introduction to a recent book of essays devoted to her work, Katherine R. Chandler and Melissa Goldthwaite note that “tensions and oppositions abound in her work . . . As critics, we have set our sights on ferreting out how those contradictions contribute ...

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Memory is the Only Way Home: A Conversational Interview with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 13-20

A cloudless June day, and already hot out on the bone-white slick-rock north of Moab, Utah. Writer-naturalist Terry Tempest Williams and I, escorted by an entourage of pesky gnats, are hiking out across a rolling sea of sand and sandstone, into a brilliant sun backlighting the hobgoblin landscape of Arches National Park—Abbey Country ...

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Wild Heart: The Politics of Place

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pp. 21-33

Our guest today is Terry Tempest Williams, naturalist-in-residence in the Utah Museum of Natural History and author of Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place, which chronicles the rise of the Great Salt Lake and the death of her mother from ovarian cancer. Her book, An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field ...

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Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 34-49

Terry Tempest Williams has written that “it’s strange to feel change coming. It’s easy to ignore. An underlying restlessness seems to accompany it like birds flocking before a storm. We go about our business with the usual alacrity, while in the pit of our stomach there is a sense of something tenuous.” ...

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The Politics of Place: An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 50-59

The connection between language and landscape is a perennial theme of American letters. Nature has been a well-spring for many of our finest writers—from Whitman and Thoreau to Peter Mathiessen and Edward Abbey. Terry Tempest Williams belongs in this tradition. A native of Utah, her naturalist writing has been richly ...

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Terry Tempest Williams and Ona Siporin: A Conversation

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pp. 60-71

The intricate moves of Terry Tempest Williams in her efforts towards environmental justice are to turn the kaleidoscope ninety degrees, to listen to a shell (Pieces of White Shell), to translate the calligraphy of herons in flight (An Unspoken Hunger), to name the snows (The Secret Language of Snow), and to trace the rapid ...

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A Conversation with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 72-92

On a cold spring day in central Iowa, the interviewers traveled with Terry Tempest Williams to the small town of Kalona, home to an Amish community. On the perimeter of that community, we had lunch at a home-style cafe and visited an antique store, a converted church where we discovered among the dry sinks, oak tables, tinker toys, ...

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Talking to Terry Tempest Williams: About Writing, the Environment, and Being a Mormon

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pp. 93-99

Terry Tempest Williams is a naturalist and writer from Utah. Her book Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place, which documents the rise and fall of the Great Salt Lake in the mid-1980s as well as the impact of fallout-induced cancer on the women of her family, became an almost instant classic in the literature of nature. ...

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Testimony, Refuge, and the Sense of Place: A Conversation with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 100-114

Having grown up in Utah, Williams has had a lifetime interest in the natural world that surrounds her. This is apparent in her education and work. She holds a B.A. in English and an M.A. in environmental education from the University of Utah and has worked as a teacher at Navajo Reservation in Montezuma Creek, Utah, ...

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The Transformative Power of Art: An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 115-130

We live in the midst of the sacred and the profane, light and darkness, conscious and unconscious, life and death, visible and invisible worlds sometimes meshing, sometimes colliding, always moving us towards the mystery, ever deeper. And we wonder as we wander. This is our journey on this edition of New Dimensions, as we explore ...

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Lighting the Match: An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 131-136

In many ways, the idea for this issue of Whole Terrain was born the day I heard Terry Tempest Williams read from her most recent book Leap. She ascribed the inspiration for her book’s title to W. H. Auden’s poem, “Leap Before You Look.” “I love the way this poem embraces the idea of risk,” she explained, “particularly his last line, ...

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Wild Mercy and Restoring the Dialogue: Reflections on 9/11

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pp. 137-145

In the months following the devastating bombings of the World Trade Center Towers on September 11, 2001, Terry Tempest Williams—along with dozens of other writers, artists, activists, religious figures, community leaders—participated in A Time for Choices, a series of brief interviews with Michael Toms of New Dimensions Radio. ...

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An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 146-159

Terry Tempest Williams is perhaps best known for her book Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place (Pantheon, 1991), in which she chronicles the epic rise of the Great Salt Lake and the flooding of the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in 1983, alongside her mother’s diagnosis with ovarian cancer, believed to be caused by ...

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Coffee Talk: A Chat with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 160-164

Environmental writer and poet Terry Tempest Williams sat at a table at the Excelsior Inn about 8 o’clock on a Friday morning a couple of weks ago. In town to lecture and lead some writing workshops at the UO, she squeezed me into her busy schedule. Too early for me, I’d arrived at the restaurant several minutes prior just to get enough coffee down my gullet ...

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A Conversation with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 165-167

Naturalist, writer, and conservationist Terry Tempest Williams has written numerous books including the esteemed Refuge (Pantheon, 2000) and her most recent books Leap (Pantheon, 2000) and Red (Pantheon, 2001). Williams is currently on the board of directors of the Murie Center and the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. ...

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An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams

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pp. 168-175

The sun was setting on a late October afternoon when I met with author Terry Tempest Williams in a hotel conference room built over a saltwater marsh near San Pablo Bay in San Rafael, California. She was in my hometown that day to deliver a Sunday morning keynote lecture about her latest book, The Open Space of Democracy, ...

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The Wild Mind: Terry Tempest Williams and the Writing Process

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pp. 176-186

When I first contacted Terry Tempest Williams to discuss A Voice in the Wilderness, she wrote me back and told me that the one interview that she had never given—but always wanted to—was an interview on the writing process itself. She said that she had always wanted to explore with an interviewer the nuts and bolts ...

Appendix

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pp. 187-190

Index

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pp. 191-196