Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

List of Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

A number of institutions helped make this book possible. The History Department at the University of Colorado furnished a Douglas A. Bean Fellowship to fund summer research, and a Dean’s Small Grant provided funds for a December trip to Ohio archives while I worked on my dissertation. Kent State University gave me release time from teaching to devote all my...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xvi

Dudley Woodbridge moved to the newly settled town of Marietta at the confluence of the Ohio and Muskingum rivers in 1789. A merchant from Norwich, Connecticut, he often wrote of going “across the mountains” when planning a trip. His son, Dudley Jr., used that phrase too, but more commonly referred to the region as “the Western Country.” His son, in turn...

read more

Part I Across the Mountains

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-6

The Allegheny and Monongahela rivers come together on the western slopes of the Appalachian Mountains to form the Ohio River. Initially, the Ohio flows northwest, but it soon turns southwestward until it reaches the Big Sandy River, the boundary between present-day West Virginia and Kentucky, a little over three hundred miles from its source...

read more

1: Claiming Space

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-24

In December of 1788 Dudley Woodbridge, a merchant of Norwich, Connecticut, wrote to his brother-in-law, James Backus, a surveyor in the employ of the Ohio Company, asking for information about the company’s purchase. Business is “exceeding dull, & Money grows scarcer,” Woodbridge complained. He wanted James to send him a detailed report about “the...

read more

2: Planting a Place

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-38

Having ousted the Native Americans who called the Ohio Valley home, white inhabitants could at last turn their full attention to settling the region. Different groups had different roles to play, but the goals and the methods they used to accomplish them meshed together well as they strove to transform space into a place to call home. Speculators made the land accessible...

read more

Part II The Western Country

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-42

By the turn of the century, the ex-colonists had succeeded in exiling the Ohio Indians from their homes. The land across the mountains now rested firmly in the hands of the new United States, laying the foundation for an inland empire, and the trickle of settlers down the Ohio would become a flood. As Rufus Putnam and others intended, newly independent Americans...

read more

3: Creating a Subregional Hub

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-61

At eighteen years of age in early January of 1797, Dudley Woodbridge Jr. embarked on a buying trip from Marietta to Philadelphia at the behest of his father. He safely crossed the Ohio River on his way to Wheeling, eighty miles upstream on the river’s eastern shore in western Virginia. But two days later he encountered difficulties crossing one of the Ohio’s many tributaries. He...

read more

4: Connecting East and West

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 62-80

Fostering the growth of a town’s hinterland in the West depended on a merchant’s ability to create connections between his customers and the wider world of capital and goods on the Atlantic seaboard. Nurturing these links involved gathering items for export, transporting them down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, planning and executing buying trips to Philadelphia, and...

read more

5: The Dimensions of the Riverine Economy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-100

As a visitor to the West, Fortescue Cuming kept a record of his trip as he descended the Ohio River in 1807. On a fine afternoon in July he wrote: we proceeded from Marietta, accompanied by a Mr. Fry, a genteel and well informed lawyer, from the vicinity of Boston in search of an establishment in some part of this new country. We had also as a passenger, a countryman, by...

read more

6: The Western Country

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-118

In 1813 a New York merchant named Isaac H. Jackson decided to move to the Ohio Valley. He planned to visit a variety of places before choosing his new home, and with him he carried a handful of introductions from fellow merchants in New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia to their counterparts across the mountains. Each letter to a merchant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,...

read more

Part III The Buckeye State

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-122

During the early republic, the sense of place that grew up in the West had a two fold aspect. On the one hand, merchants had tied East and West together along lines of capital and credit from the first days of settlement. As Americans, Dudley Woodbridge Sr. and others who went west had claimed space for a new empire. On the other hand, during the first two decades of the...

read more

7: Ohio’s Economy Transformed

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-138

In the summer of 1822 a Philadelphia wholesaler wrote Dudley Woodbridge Jr., seeking a market for his goods in Ohio. Woodbridge replied: I received your favor of this date—The quantity of shoes & axes I cou’d retail in a year would be so limited, that it would not be an object to your acquaintance to send them so far—Our shoemakers & blacksmiths supply the market with...

read more

8: A New Sense of Place

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-154

When Nahum Ward first crossed the Appalachian Mountains in 1811 and 1812 to speculate in the lands of the Ohio Valley, he wrote letters to his father back in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, praising “the western country,” for he believed he could make his fortune there. While raising a family in Marietta, Ward continued to refer to himself as a resident of the “western woods”...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-158

For a long time, scholars relegated the history of the early republic to the final chapter of tomes about colonial history or the first chapter of studies focusing on Jacksonian America, while others concentrated on great thinkers, such as Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, who dominated the politics of post-Revolutionary America. This state of affairs has changed in...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-194

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-206

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-214