Cover

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Front Matter

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Table of Contents

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p. ix

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiii

I wish to extend my sincerest gratitude to the eight individuals who gave me permission to translate and publish their interviews or excerpts from them in this volume: Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Konstantinov, Natalia Valentinovna Altukhova, Natalia P., Arkadii Olegovich Darchenko, Natalia Fedorovna Belovolova, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-23

On October 4, 1957, a Soviet R-7 intercontinental ballistic missile lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan with a 184-pound polished silver sphere called Sputnik (“Traveling Companion”). The size of a beach ball, the world’s first artificial satellite contained two beeping radio transmitters that allowed ...

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1 “Sasha the Muscovite” | Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Konstantinov

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pp. 24-54

It’s hard to be on time in Russia, even for someone like me who habitually shows up early. But on this occasion the fault was all mine; I erred in deciding to walk from the red line’s University metro stop in southwestern Moscow to campus so that I could embrace my nostalgia. Moscow University, after all, had been my home ...

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2 “Back then I really wanted to join the party” | Natalia Valentinovna Altukhova (maiden name Pronina)

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pp. 55-86

A member of Saratov’s School No. 42’s A group, Natalia Valentinovna Altukhova (maiden name Pronina) took her degree in economics at the Saratov Polytechnic Institute (today the Saratov Technical University). She later completed her candidate’s degree (roughly the equivalent of a Ph.D.) at the Moscow Economic-Statistical Institute. ...

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3 “We grew up in a normal time” | Natalia P.

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pp. 87-119

I interviewed Natalia P. immediately following my interview with Natalia Valentinovna Altukhova (Pronina). A heat spell had descended upon Saratov, and since air conditioning remains rare in provincial Russia, I took Natalia P. up on her offer to hold the interview in her apartment, which had a window air conditioning ...

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4 “Our entire generation . . . welcomed perestroika” | Arkadii Olegovich Darchenko

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pp. 120-153

Arkadii Olegovich Darchenko showed up at my apartment that morning with a ready smile on his face and a pile of old photographs from his school years. Upbeat and enthusiastic, he expressed great interest in my project and later helped me locate some of his classmates by supplying me with current phone numbers. ...

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5 “I saw the life of my country, and thereby my own, from a variety of perspectives” | Natalia Aleksandrovna Belovolova (maiden name Ianichkina)

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pp. 154-186

An elite school that took pride in its academic rigor, School No. 42 sent all but a few of its students each year to Saratov’s (and occasionally Moscow’s) top colleges. Being admitted to a university’s evening division, or having to sit things out a year before reapplying elsewhere, represented scenarios that brought ...

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6 “It’s very hard to be a woman in our country” | Olga Vladimirovna Kamaiurova

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pp. 187-219

A. A. Konstantinov (see chapter 1) urged me to give top priority to finding and interviewing Olga Vladimirovna Kamaiurova, who also belonged to the B group of the class of ’67. Although he had not seen her since leaving Saratov in 1967 to attend Moscow University, he assured me that I undoubtedly would find her ...

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7 “I came to understand things, but only gradually” | Aleksandr Vladimirovich Trubnikov

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pp. 220-252

Like A. A. Konstantinov, whose interview opens this volume and who graduated at the top of his class in group B, Aleksandr Vladimirovich Trubnikov received a gold medal for the most distinguished academic record among those in group A. His classmates spoke fondly of him, insisting that he would be an informative ...

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8 “People have lost a great deal in terms of their confidence in tomorrow” | Gennadii Viktorovich Ivanov

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pp. 253-280

I interviewed Gennadii Viktorovich Ivanov in an apartment I rented that summer in downtown Saratov. I was eager to meet him, because I knew that he had been in Afghanistan at some point following the Soviet invasion of that country in December 1979. Moreover, his classmates had described him as an avid sportsman in his youth, ...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 281-286

Index

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pp. 287-299

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About the Author

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Donald J. Raleigh is Jay Richard Judson Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he teaches modern Russian and Soviet history. He is author, editor, or translator of numerous books, including Revolution on the Volga: 1917 in Saratov; ...