In this Book

Managing Ethnic Diversity after 9/11
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
America's approach to terrorism has focused on traditional national security methods, under the assumption that terrorism's roots are foreign and the solution to greater security lies in conventional practices. Europe offers a different model, with its response to internal terrorism relying on police procedures.Managing Ethnic Diversity after 9/11 compares these two strategies and considers that both may have engendered greater radicalization--and a greater chance of home-grown terrorism. Essays address how transatlantic countries, including the United Kingdom, the United States, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands have integrated ethnic minorities, especially Arabs and Muslims, since 9/11. Discussing the "securitization of integration," contributors argue that the neglect of civil integration has challenged the rights of these minorities and has made greater security more remote.

Table of Contents

  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Figures
  2. p. ix
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Tables
  2. p. xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. xiii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Quandaries of Integration in America and Europe: An Introduction
  2. pp. 1-19
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Security and/or Participation: On the Need to Reconcile Differing Conceptions of Migrant Integration
  2. pp. 20-39
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Security and the Integration of Immigrants in Europe and the United States
  2. pp. 40-58
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Security and Antiterror Policies in America and Europe
  2. pp. 59-78
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Integration, Security, and Faith Identity in Social Policy in Britain
  2. pp. 79-97
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. The Clash of Perceptions: Comparisons of Views among Muslims in Paris, London, and Berlin with Those among the General Public
  2. pp. 98-113
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. How to Make Enemies: A Transatlantic Perspective on the Radicalization Process and Integration Issues
  2. pp. 114-136
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Security and Immigrant Integration Policy in France and the United States: Evaluating Convergence and Success
  2. pp. 137-164
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Toward a European Policy of Integration? Divergence and Convergence of Immigrant Integration Policy in Britain and France
  2. pp. 165-177
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Typologizing Discriminatory Practices: Law Enforcement and Minorities in France, Italy, and the United States
  2. pp. 178-191
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. The Security Implications in the Demand for Health Care Workers in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands
  2. pp. 192-211
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. Asylees and Refugees: A Comparative Examination of Problems of Integration
  2. pp. 212-232
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Culturalization of Citizenship in the Netherlands
  2. pp. 233-252
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 14. Comparitive Integration Contexts and Mexican Imigrant-Group Incorporation in the United States
  2. pp. 253-275
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 15. Conclusion: Lessons Learned and Their Policy Implications
  2. pp. 276-284
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes on Contributors
  2. pp. 285-287
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 289-201
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.