Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xiii

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xv

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-xx

ABOOK ABOUT Kenneth Burke in the 1920s should probably be written in the form of a collage rather than as a formal academic essay. Not only would collage as form be appropriate to a discussion that centers around the concept of literary modernism, but an effective collage would...

read more

1. Introduction [Includes Image Plates]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-19

AS MARJORIE PERLOFF has recently noted, "Surely no literary term has raised more controversy and misunderstanding than the modest little word modernism" (154). Perloff's comment was directed to literary scholars and critics, especially to those who have been...

read more

2. Overview: A Flaubert in Greenwich Village

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-60

ON SEPTEMBER 17, 1917, James Light wrote a desperate letter from Columbus, Ohio, to his close friend Kenneth Burke in Weehawken, New Jersey. "We [Light and his companion Sue Jenkins] must get to New York, and you must make it possible," he wrote. "I beg you by...

read more

3. Burke among Others: The Early Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-84

BURKE'S LETTER TO Cowley on January 6, 1918, was not the only place where he announced his intentions. Burke's mother was visiting relatives back in Pittsburgh at the time of his decision, and because she very much wanted her son to complete his college degree, Burke a day later...

read more

4. Thomas Mann, the Little Magazines, and Burke's Short Fiction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-114

I T'S NOT THAT BURKE had never tried fiction before 1919. He wrote several stories in high school, and in 1917 he contributed "A Parabolic Tale, with Invocation," an irreverent, 300-word Aesopian parable dedicated to the wisdom of youth, to the first issue of Sansculotte. Later that...

read more

5. At The Dial -- and Up against Dada

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-136

BURKE'S FICTION BROUGHT him to the attention of a small group of committed modernists who were just beginning the venture of creating a new version of The Dial as a place dedicated to modern arts and letters. The publication of "Mrs. Maecenas" was an auspicious event for Burke. ...

read more

6. Counter-Statement as Counter Statement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 137-164

COUNTER-STATEMENT, too, like many of Burke's essays in The Dial, can be seen as the product of an aesthete sensibility, as a document with clear links to the Symbolists as well as to other modernist groups and doctrines. It takes up standard modernist artists, texts, topics, and...

read more

7. Conclusion: Conversing with Modernism in Towards a Better Life

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-180

BURKE'S Towards a Better Life; Being a Series of Epistles, or Declamations, written over several years from 1927 to 1931 and published in the first days of 1932, is as difficult to overview as Burke's other fiction. The book jacket copy that Burke composed for his experiment...

An Informal Chronology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-203

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 204-255

Works Cited and Consulted

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 256-274

Index [Includes List of other works in series and Back Cover]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 275-284