In this Book

Classical Epic Tradition
summary

The literary epic and critical theories about the epic tradition are traced from Aristotle and Callimachus through Apollonius, Virgil, and their successors such as Chaucer and Milton to Eisenstein, Tolstoy, and Thomas Mann. Newman's revisionist critique will challenge all scholars, students, and general readers of the classics, comparative literature, and western literary traditions.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. I. A Map of the Terrain
  2. pp. 3-36
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  1. II. Aristotle, Callimachus and the Ancient Critical Tradition
  2. pp. 37-72
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  1. III. Apollonius Rhodius
  2. pp. 73-103
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  1. IV. Virgil
  2. pp. 104-187
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  1. V. The Latin Epic after Virgil: Ovid to Statius
  2. pp. 188-243
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  1. VI. The Critical Failure: Dante and Petrarch
  2. pp. 244-292
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  1. VII: The Italian Tradition
  2. pp. 293-338
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  1. VIII. The English Tradition: Chaucer and Milton
  2. pp. 339-398
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  1. IX. The Modern Epic—I: Eisenstein and Pudovkin
  2. pp. 399-447
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  1. X. The Modern Epic—II: Tolstoy and Thomas Mann
  2. pp. 448-514
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  1. Glossary of Chritical Terms
  2. pp. 515-534
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  1. Select Bibliography
  2. pp. 535-552
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 553-566
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