Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiii

On the afternoon of September 11, 2001, Wayne Wiegand and James Danky, co-directors of the Center for the History of Print Culture in Modern America, a joint program of the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the Wisconsin Historical Society, arrived at an obvious but not surprising decision. Namely, that the conference, “Women ...

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Foreword

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pp. xv-xxi

At a time of concern about whether feminist scholarship has become overdisciplined within the academy and irrelevant to some of the broad questions that animated an earlier generation’s contributions, this strong, vital collection of essays is inspirational. Drawing on scholarship in history, literature, religion, and sociology, this volume is animated ...

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Connecting Lives: Women and Reading, Then and Now

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pp. 3-24

Despite the dire prophecies of cultural pessimists who forecast the imminent overthrow of books and reading by electronic and other media, these reminders of the age of Gutenberg are surviving, even thriving.1 So much so that, to adapt Mark Twain’s familiar adage, reports of the demise of reading are greatly exaggerated. Beginning in Seattle in 1998, ...

Part 1: Print for a Purpose: Women as Editors and Publishers

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Cultural Critique and Consciousness Raising: Clara Bewick Colby’s Woman’s Tribune and Late-Nineteenth-Century Radical Feminism

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pp. 27-63

For Clara Bewick Colby (1846–1916), editor and publisher of the suffrage journal the Woman’s Tribune from 1883 to 1909, radical feminism was an ideology foundational to her editorial vision. But who was this influential suffrage presswoman, and what was the Woman’s Tribune? While Colby was not on the earliest “front lines” of the suffrage movement when the ...

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“Her Very Handwriting Looks as if She Owned the Earth”: Elizabeth Jordan and Editorial Power

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pp. 64-76

In her autobiography Three Rousing Cheers, published in 1938 when she was seventy-three, Elizabeth Garver Jordan wrote: “I have been pianiste, reporter, newspaper editor, magazine editor, public speaker, playwright, dramatic critic, and novelist”—humorously adding, “which helps to explain why I have never done any one thing superlatively well. ...

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Making News: Marie Potts and the Smoke Signal of the Federated Indians of California

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pp. 77-125

The first edition of the newspaper Smoke Signal was issued in January 1948. Published by the Federated Indians of California (FIC) and edited Mason Potts, the Smoke Signal achieved national recognition in the early 1970s as a pioneering example of the political promise inherent in the budding American Indian press.1 Smoke Signal was by then in its ...

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Unbossed and Unbought: Booklegger Press, the First Women-Owned American Library Publisher

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pp. 126-155

In July 2001, the Committee on Professional Ethics of the American Library Association (ALA) adopted a special explanatory statement of the ALA’s Code of Ethics titled “Questions and Answers on Librarian Speech in the Workplace.” The document states that, “Through the Library Bill of Rights and its Interpretations, the American Library As-...

Part 2: Women in a World of Books

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Alice Millard and the Gospel of Beauty and Taste

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pp. 159-178

In 1896 two ambitious, creative, middle-class Chicago sisters in their early twenties set off for Europe to further their educations.1 Emily Parsons went to Berlin to study piano, while Alice Parsons studied art in London. Emily returned to Chicago to teach and perform the piano. Alice would eventually teach and perform as well, in southern...

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Women and Intellectual Resources: Interpreting Print Culture at the Library of Congress

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pp. 179-207

Librarians are world-class detectives, able to take a query on any subject and trace the answer to its source or to locate information on any topic, specific or broad. Their tools are uniformity and systematization: by shaping common intellectual approaches to their print collections, they impose an order that both assists searching and presents readers and ...

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A “Bouncing Babe,” a “Little Bastard”: Women, Print, and the Door-Kewaunee Regional Library, 1950–52

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pp. 208-225

In the summer of 19501, Wisconsin Free Library Commission (WFLC) consultant Anne Farrington wrote to her friend and colleague Gretchen Schenk, “All day today I’ve struggled to write an article for ALA [American Library Association] Bulletin and one for Minnesota Libraries. Being in a very low state of mind . . . all that came forth was this ditty. ...

Part 3: A Centrifugal Force: Gendered Agency through Print

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Power through Print: Lois Waisbrooker and Grassroots Feminism

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pp. 229-250

...“A Queer Old Woman Thinks She Has a Mission to Perform,” announced a headline in the State Journal of Topeka, Kansas, in August 1894. Indeed it must have seemed so to the editors of the newspaper. Defying the Comstock Act, passed in 1873 to prohibit the mailing of “obscene” material, an aged Lois Waisbrooker had since the mid-1860s ...

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Woman’s Work for Woman: Gendered Print Culture in American Mission Movement Narratives

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pp. 251-280

In their writing, reading, and circulation of texts for the American foreign mission movement, late nineteenth-century women used print to address religious objectives while also supporting self-fashioning processes based upon shared social beliefs and activities. Their publications reached eager (if highly specialized) audiences all over the world ...

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“When Women Condemn the Whole Race”: Belle Case La Follette’s Women’s Column Attacks the Color Line

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pp. 281-296

In 1931 Belle Case La Follette was hailed by the New York Times as “perhaps the least known, yet the most influential of all the American women who have had to do with public affairs in this country.”1 More than seventy years later, her legacy remains under-appreciated. Once a powerful force in progressive politics, both in Wisconsin and on the...

Contributors

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pp. 299-302

Index

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pp. 303-308