Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

read more

1. Legs: A Memoir of Childhood and Adolescence

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-38

This is my first memory: I'm taking a shower with one of my young aunts and I'm reaching for her pubis. She giggles and swirls around me. I'm standing on my own, but I don't talk yet. The bathroom where we're showering is the only place in our house I vaguely remember. The white-washed walls are damp, streaked with lichen growing around the edges of the cement floor.

read more

2. Manuel Puig: The Writer as Diva

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-61

The Argentinean expatriate writer Manuel Puig was one of the most effeminate men I've ever known. I met him in 1977 in a fiction workshop at Columbia University. The workshop was open to anyone in the city, and the only requirement was to submit a manuscript that Puig approved. I delivered my first novella to Puig at his Bedford Street address. Puig opened the door a tiny crack, took the manuscript, and asked me where I was from.

read more

3. The Last Days of Reinaldo Arenas: A Sadness as Deep as the Sea

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 62-69

Early in December 1990 the literary agent Thomas Colchie called to say that the exiled Cuban writer Reinaldo Arenas-who lived around the corner from me, in Hell's Kitchen-was in what looked like the final stages of AIDS and that he had expressed a desire to hear from me.

read more

4. Federico Garcia Lorca and Internalized Homophobia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-102

I came to terms with my own internalized homophobia only after Manuel and Reinaldo and other close friends died of AIDS. In a way, I can say that it was because of AIDS that I finally learned to love gay men as soul mates.

read more

5. The Other Jaime Manrique: A Dead Soul

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-111

I first heard about the other Jaime Manrique in the spring of 1992, shortly after the publication of my novel Latin Moon in Manhattan. One night I received a call from a woman who introduced herself as my ex-wife. I told her that I had never been married and that I was a gay man.

read more

6. Nowadays

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 112-114

I didn't set out to write this book. Soon after Manuel Puig died, I felt compelled to write down what I remembered about him as a way of clarifying what he had meant to me. In bits and pieces I composed the memoir included in this volume. But two years went by after its completion before I took any steps to get it published. In the meantime Reinaldo had died.

Source Information

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-116