In this Book

AIDS in French Culture
summary

The deluge of metaphors triggered in 1981 in France by the first public reports of what would turn out to be the AIDS epidemic spread with far greater speed and efficiency than the virus itself. To understand why it took France so long to react to the AIDS crisis, AIDS in French Culture analyzes the intersections of three discourses—the literary, the medical, and the political—and traces the origin of French attitudes about AIDS back to nineteenth-century anxieties about nationhood, masculinity, and sexuality.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Copyright
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  1. CONTENTS
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction: Where Does AIDS Come from?
  2. pp. 3-16
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  1. 1. Degeneracy and Inversion: The Male Homosexual as Internal Other
  2. pp. 17-30
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  1. 2. Gender Indecision and Cultural Anxiety: Outing Zola
  2. pp. 31-61
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  1. 3. Reclaiming Disease and Infection: Jean Genet and the Politics of the Border
  2. pp. 62-95
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  1. 4. A Cultural History of AIDS Discourse: France and the United States
  2. pp. 96-111
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  1. 5. AIDS and the Unraveling of Modernity: The Example of Herv
  2. pp. 112-148
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  1. Conclusion: French Universalism and the Question of Community
  2. pp. 149-164
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  1. NOTES
  2. pp. 165-182
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  1. BIBLIOGRAPHY
  2. pp. 183-196
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  1. INDEX
  2. pp. 197-204
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