Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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p. ix

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Preface

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pp. xi-xiii

Year after year a story is told in Bogot

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Introduction

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pp. 3-11

This is the story of the violent death of Jorge Eli

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1. The Dialectics of Public Life

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pp. 13-38

Alfonso L

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2. The Making of a Man in the Middle

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pp. 39-55

Jorge Eliécer Gaitán was born on January 23, 1898—a year before the War of the Thousand Days broke out—in Las Cruces, an impoverished Bogotá neighborhood known as the "barrio of the fallen aristocracy."1 The once-respectable if not fashionable barrio was sufficiently close to the center of the city to allow Jorge Eliécer's proud parents to bypass their own parish of Santa...

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3. Encounters on the Middle Ground

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pp. 56-76

Gait

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4. The Expansion of Public Space

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pp. 77-103

Early in March 1944 on a small farm outside of Bogot

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5. The Pressures of Power

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pp. 104-131

By the end of 1945 the Liberals were in hopeless disarray. The jefes had little choice but to rely on Gabriel Turbay to stop Gait

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6. The Middle Ground Disappears

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pp. 132-154

Gait

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7. The Crowd

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pp. 155-172

Although violent, the first actions of the crowd followed traditional lines. The first protesters had partisan aims. They marched on the palacio to seek justice from a Conservative government for the death of a Liberal. Others followed Liberal leaders who walked to the presidential residence in search of a political solution to an infraction of the moral order. The first targets were...

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8. The Demise of Convivencia

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pp. 173-199

On the afternoon of April 9 the traditional hierarchies of public life were turned upside down. The crowd took center stage. The traditional leaders, with hardly enough time to respond to events, became spectators. The Conservatives in government were relegated to the gallery. The Liberals turned their backs on the crowd, squinting for a glimpse of their Conservative...

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Conclusion

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pp. 200-204

What is remembered? Colombians recall different pasts. Memories are so vivid that it is difficult to believe that these events occurred more than thirty years ago. It is as though Gaitan and the bogotazo, known in Colombia more historically and simply as "el nueve de abril,"1 had taken place just yesterday, as though the long Violencia of which few wish to speak had not taken place...

Notes

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pp. 207-256

Bibliography

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pp. 257-271

Index

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pp. 273-282