Cover

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Title Page / Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

The Christian churches in Africa, alongside other faith traditions, have a pandemic in their midst. It is not going away soon. In the pages that follow, I offer theological reflections on the pandemic based on the claim that humanity has the imago dei, and suggest ways the church must scale...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

The HIV/AIDS pandemic that has struck the global community has brought fear, shame, stigmatization, discrimination, isolation, economic hardships, illness, pain, despair, and death. In this book, I will use the theological motif imago dei to rethink the obligations and responsibilities of Christian churches in Africa in a day of HIV/AIDS. I use...

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1. Background to HIV/AIDS in Africa

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pp. 9-39

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) first came to public notice in 1981. In 1983 researchers identified the following modes of transmission: sexual intercourse (various forms); exposure to blood products; parent to child transmission, especially during childbirth; and intravenous...

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2. The Imago Dei and its Implications for HIV/AIDS

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pp. 41-69

In this chapter, I propose the imago dei as a basis for grounding and for scaling up the church’s practical obligations in dealing with the HIV/AIDS pandemic. I argue that the imago dei calls for an ethic of love and compassion.1 The HIV/AIDS pandemic calls for a critical and humble reading of the Bible. The passage from the Hebrew Bible quoted above...

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3. HIV/AIDS and the Human Virtues

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pp. 71-94

In this chapter, I explore virtues of hope, fidelity, care, justice, and prudence in light of HIV/AIDS because the pandemic threatens eudaimonia.1 Virtue theory has enjoyed a revival in ethical discourse during the last two decades, since Alasdair MacIntyre, a leading proponent of virtue theory, decried the loss of virtue in the modern world.2 In Whose Justice? Which Rationality? MacIntyre, discussed four moral traditions: the Aristotelian...

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4. The Imago Dei Invites a Bold Community Praxis

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pp. 95-130

In this chapter, I argue that the idea of the imago dei invites members of the Christian community to engage in a bold praxis, at the local level and at the national and international levels. I will talk about the local level first and then address the role of national (denominational and ecumenical) organizations. I will conclude by discussing the role of Bible...

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5. The Church, Globalization, and HIV/AIDS

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pp. 131-169

The remarks by Nelson Mandela invite the international community to respond to HIV/AIDS in the age of globalization.3 In this chapter, I explore the concept of globalization and its relationship to HIV/AIDS and argue that the Christian community worldwide needs to respond to global changes and advocate for a “truly comprehensive response,” as...

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Conclusion: The Challenge of Individual Responsibility and Global Obligation

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pp. 171-183

HIV/AIDS has now affected individuals and families around the world, but it has caused more devastation in Africa than elsewhere. It is a private and public tragedy. I have argued that the Christian community in Africa has an obligation toward people living with HIV/AIDS because humanity is created in the image of God. Members of the Christian...

Notes

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pp. 185-221

Bibliography

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pp. 223-244

Index

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pp. 245-251