Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

People to whom I owe debts of gratitude are too numerous to count. First and foremost, thanks to Anne Allison, K

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Chapter One. The Heart of the Matter: Gender, Intimacy, and Consumption in the Production of Shojo Manga

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pp. 1-24

On a sunny afternoon in the spring of 2001, in a conference room on an upper floor of a Tokyo office building, Sōda Naoko and I discussed the ins and outs of editing shōjo manga, from deadline details, to shopping for survey prizes, to brainstorming with artists on a new story.1 Much of the two years that I spent in Tokyo researching the shōjo manga industry...

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Chapter Two. Descent and Alliance in the Shojo Manga Family Tree: A Postwar History

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pp. 25-56

As the two quotes above imply, the publishing industry and the manga industry within it have played a significant role in the shaping of postwar Japan. Indeed, as Shogakukan’s corporate philosophy suggests, the media can shape the way that values are understood, and in Japan manga is a primary form of media. For many of the scholars, editors, and artists I spoke...

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Chapter Three. Raising Readers, Rearing Artists: Fabricating Community in Shojo Manga Magazines

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pp. 57-88

Amid the stacks of manga (both printed and drafts), character goods, and the typical hustle and bustle of the manga office in the late afternoon, Saejima Tomomi and I discussed her experiences as an editor at a shōjo manga magazine. Saejima’s animated description of the magazine she edits highlights...

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Chapter Four. Affective Labor: Gender, Generation, and Consumption in the Production of Shojo Manga

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pp. 89-109

This standard account of the postwar history of manga, culled from countless interviews and conversations, tells the story of the rebirth of an industry and the generation of children who were inspired by it and, in fact, made it what it is today.1 While clearly a view through the rose-colored tint of hindsight, this account nonetheless leads us to think about the relationship...

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Chapter Five. Material Gals: Girls' Sexuality, Girls' Culture, and Shojo Manga

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pp. 110-134

The kogyaru as heroine of Shibuya, depicted in the promotional tagline for “Gals!” above, is telling of the relationship between shōjo manga and the discourses about girls that surfaced in the 1990s. “Gals!” by Fujii Mihona, is a typical millennial shōjo manga that ran in Shueisha’s Ribon magazine from late 1999 through 2003. The antics of the gals (gyaru) Kotobuki...

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Epilogue Shojo Manga at Large

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pp. 135-146

Beginning in 2002 Wired magazine added a column called “Japanese Schoolgirl Watch” to their “Play: Culture. Gear. Obsessions.” section, an odd move for a technology guru magazine. The short blurbs in the “Japanese Schoolgirl Watch” detail the latest trends among Japanese schoolgirls, ranging from emoticons for mobile phones, to black spray paint to cover up bleached hair at school, to the “cool-hunters at GirlsLab” cited above.2...

Appendix A. Magazine List

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pp. 147-148

Appendix B. Manga Division Organizational Chart

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pp. 149-150

Notes

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pp. 151-164

Works Cited

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pp. 165-180

Index

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pp. 181-184