Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This volume could not have been produced without the generous assistance and good humor of numerous individuals. Much of the early work, creating formats and proofreading, for example, benefitted from the expertise of Chelle Brookes, Aloysius Canete, Alberto Perez-Pereiro, Joseph Maranville, and Michael Zier. References and encouragement were kindly provided by Karen L. Adams, ...

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-x

Map 1. Taj-speaking areas in Southeast Asia and Southern China.

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pp. xi-xii

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Chapter 1: Introduction

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pp. 1-4

The Tai language family extends from Assam in the west to northern Vietnam in the east, from southern China in the north to the Malay peninsula in the south. At the far western end of this area, in Assam, the related, but extinct, literary language Ahom can be found. In adjacent Myanmar (Burma), the main representatives of the Tai family include Shan and a variety of dialects on the border of Assam and Yunnan. ...

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Chapter 2: Southwestern Tai Dialects

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pp. 5-26

The Southwestern branch of the Tai family covers the largest territory and has the largest number of speakers. Probably the most well known languages in this branch are Siamese or Standard Thai in Thailand and Lao in Laos, where both are politically and socially dominant in their respective countries. Other languages and dialects can be found in northern and northeastern Myanmar as well as in Yunnan in southern China. ...

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Chapter 3: Central Tai Dialects

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pp. 27-48

The languages and dialects of the Central branch of the Tai family can be found in southern China and in northern Vietnam. Luo (1996:78) delimits the geographical boundaries of this group as follows: from the You River (You Jiang or Yu Jiang), which forms the upper and middle reaches of the Xi River, in Guangxi in the north to the Red River in Vietnam in the south; ...

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Chapter 4: Northern Tai Dialects

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pp. 49-64

The Northern branch of the Tai family forms the second largest group of Tai speakers. Luo (1996:75) describes its geographical boundaries as extending from southeastern Guizhou in the north to southern Guangxi and northern Vietnam in the south, and from northeastern Guangxi in the east to the border of Yunnan and Guangxi in the west. In addition, another northern language, Saek, forms an isolated island among Southwestern ...

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Chapter 5: Cognates

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pp. 65-194

The following Tai cognates are listed in the three branches of the Tai family: the Southwestern (SW), the Central (CN), and the Northern (N). Representing the Southwestern branch are Siamese (S), White Tai (W), Black Tai (B), Shan (Sh), the Tai dialect ofNong Khai (LNK), the Lue dialect of Chieng Hung (LCH), the Lue dialect of Muong Yong (LMY), ...

References

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pp. 195-202

Index

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pp. 203-219