Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

As it is often the case in my experience, this research project on Asian American biblical hermeneutics has led me into seemingly endless searches. Searching and re-searching on this academic and social project for the last ten years have been rewarding for me. I can only hope that my readers will also find my end product at this point in time helpful and constructive. ...

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1. What Is Asian American Biblical Hermeneutics? Medi(t)ations on and for a Conversation

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pp. 1-17

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has related his puzzlement when he found out as a student that the Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka’s appointment at the University of Cambridge had gone through a curious circuit. Originally Soyinka was supposed to have been appointed to the faculty of English, but since that faculty did not recognize African literature ...

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2. Reading with Yin Yang Eyes: Negotiating the Ideological Dilemma of a Chinese American Biblical Hermeneutics

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pp. 18-33

As it is well known to all of us, one of the defining—if not the defining—characteristics of a Chinese person in mainstream U.S. culture is our eyes (Gilman 1999: 98–110).1 This distinction has elicited such descriptions as “squinty” or “slanted” from those who do not possess it. In Ambrose Bierce’s “The Haunted Valley,” a short story published ...

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3. Ambiguous Admittance: Consent and Descent in John’s Community of “Upward” Mobility

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pp. 34-56

The idea of a multiple self, which I put forth toward the end of the previous chapter, happens to be the theme of Hualing Nieh’s Mulberry and Peach: Two Women of China (1988). The novel’s protagonist, Mulberry, develops another personality known as Peach as she makes her way from China through Taiwan and finally to the United States. ...

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4. Overlapping (His) Stories: Reading Acts in Chinese America

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pp. 57-74

Notwithstanding the contradictions, John’s rhetoric regarding a community built upon choice and consent rather than heredity or ancestry (1:13), as well as Jesus’ mysterious and mystifying origin (6:41– 42; 7:25–29, 40–52; 8:12–19; 9:28–34; 19:7–9), have a special resonance within the history of Chinese America. I am thinking here ...

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5. Redressing Bodies in Corinth: Racial/Ethnic Politics and Religious Difference in the Context of Empire

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pp. 75-97

With the growing reliance on science of the early twentieth century came a political ideology representing the nation of the United States as a body threatened by infection. During this time, in the words of David Palumbo-Liu, “[a] particular discursive formation evolved that blended science with politics, economics with sociology, ...

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6. Melancholia in Diaspora: Reading Paul’s Psycho-Political Operatives in 1 Corinthians

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pp. 98-115

I suggested in the last chapter that one could and should read 1 Corinthians by paying attention to Paul’s Jewish body within the context of other bodies, including (1) the Greco-Roman bodies of the Corinthians, (2) the Corinthian church body, and (3) the political body of the Roman empire. In 1 Corinthians, Paul spins Jesus’ crucifixion into a ...

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7. Immigrants and Intertexts: Biblical In(ter)ventions in Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictee

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pp. 115-134

Ever since its “resurrection” from its original publication in 1982, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictee (1995) has attracted considerable critical attention among Asian Americanists.1 While many have commented on Dictee’s language, such as its heteroglossia (Spahr 1996: 26, 31), its postmodern tendencies (Kang 1994: 91–92, 95–96), and even ...

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8. Telling Times in (Asian) America: Extraordinary Poetics, Everyday Politics, and Endless Paradoxes

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pp. 134-146

Almost half a century ago, Ernst Käseman claimed that “apocalyptic is the mother of all Christian theology” (1969: 102).1 Today, we may wonder not only about his encompassing and totalizing “all,” but also about his singular and definitive “mother.” Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, for instance, has declared that Calcutta is her mother, ...

Notes

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pp. 147-206

Works Cited

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pp. 207-250

Index

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pp. 251-258