Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Editor’s Preface

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pp. ix-xiii

The University of Hawai‘i Press has long been noted for its scholarly publications in and commitment to the field of Asian studies. This series, “Dimensions of Asian Spirituality,” is in keeping with that commitment. It is a most appropriate time for such...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xvii

This book originated at a party. During the East-West Philosophers Conference held in Honolulu in January 2000, a small number of us philosophers were gathered in Henry Rosemont’s temporary quarters at the East-West Center’s Lincoln Hall. Henry is both an old friend and respected colleague, not to mention most gracious host. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xx

First I wish to thank Henry Rosemont of St. Mary’s College and Patricia Crosby of the University of Hawai‘i Press for undertaking this new project, a series on Asian spirituality, and for inviting me to participate in it with this volume. Henry’s comments on the manuscript’s first draft helped shaped the book in profound ways...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Shinto is particularly difficult to explain, even for most Japanese. Because its basic values and patterns of behavior have filtered into Japanese culture as part of tradition, most Japanese seldom reflect on Shinto as a “religion” in which they consciously participate. For them, being Shinto is neither a set of beliefs formalized...

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Chapter 1. Entering Through the Torii

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pp. 9-37

This chapter takes us into an experience at the heart of Shinto spirituality, whether existential or essentialist. As mentioned in the introduction, one does not necessarily have to be Shinto to feel Shinto. In my visits to Japan and to Shinto environs over the decades, I have had experiences I consider spiritual. When discussing...

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Chapter 2. Everyday Connectedness

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pp. 38-70

In the preceding chapter we analyzed Shinto spirituality in its generalized experiential form—thereby establishing a terminology and conceptual framework for the rest of the book. Chapter 1 sometimes used the first person in its phenomenological descriptions for two reasons. The first purpose was to demonstrate there...

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Chapter 3. Ancient Shinto (Prehistory–794): The Trailblazers

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pp. 71-91

The first chapter began with the experience of Shinto spirituality in its most general, not even necessarily Japanese, form. Chapter 2 described contemporary Japanese cultural behavior laden with the underlying values and ideas associated with this experience and the Shinto heritage as it has come to be part of the daily lives of many Japanese today. The next three chapters focus on the historical...

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Chapter 4. From Nara to Norinaga (794–1801): The Pathfinders

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pp. 92-118

In the previous chapter we surveyed the first phase in the evolution of Shinto, identifying various cultural, religious, philosophical, and political dimensions of its development. Much of the indigenous Shinto-related spirituality was obviously consistent with aspects of the contemporary Shinto spirituality analyzed...

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Chapter 5. All Roads Lead to Tokyo (1801–2002): The Highway Engineers

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pp. 119-147

After the death of Motoori Norinaga, the Native Studies movement continued to develop and gain in influence. The Native Studies thinkers were by no means monolithic, however, in their interests, viewpoints, and agendas. For our purposes, we can focus on the strand of the post-Norinaga movement that has probably...

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Chapter 6. The Way Home

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pp. 148-170

This final chapter speculates about Shinto’s future and the implications of our study for philosophy, religious studies, and our understanding of spirituality. The chapter has three sections. First we will summarize our findings about Shinto spirituality and outline options for Shinto’s further development in light of...

Appendix: Pronouncing Japanese Names and Terms

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pp. 171-172

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Further Reading

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pp. 173-174

Because this book is an introductory survey, it is subject to generalizations that would benefit from elaboration or qualification. Fortunately, there are fine resources available to interested readers. ...

Index

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pp. 175-184