Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

ILLUSTRATIONS

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pp. ix-x

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. xi-xiv

First and foremost, I would like to express my gratitude to Theresa May and her colleagues at the University of Texas Press for their editorial acumen, good cheer, and patience. I had the good fortune to have Kathryn R. Bork as my copy editor, and I thank her for the unerring intelligence and kindness with which she saved me from more errors than I can count. ...

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INTRODUCTION [Contains Image Plates]

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pp. 1-16

In 1575, in New Spain, the Spanish colony founded in 1521 in central Mexico after Hernán Cortés defeated the last independent rulers of the Aztec Empire, don Francisco Pimentel knew and defended his rights and privileges.1 As a scion of one of pre-Hispanic Mexico’s most illustrious aristocratic families, the ruling dynasty of Tetzcoco, don Francisco, a full blooded Indian, understood...

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1: Mixed Forms, Mixed Messages: The Codex Xolotl, the Quinatzin Map, and the Tlohtzin Map

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pp. 17-40

The Quinatzin Map, the Tlohtzin Map, and the Codex Xolotl, all today in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, first arrived in Europe in 1840 in the baggage of Joseph Marius Alexis Aubin (1802–1891), a French scientist, at one time (1826–1830) director of the science division of the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, who had resided in Mexico from 1830 ...

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2: Cemanahuactli Imachiyo, “The World, Its Model”

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pp. 41-94

In 1966 Howard F. Cline published the Oztoticpac Lands Map,1 a sixteenth-century, indigenous central Mexican property map (Fig. 2.1).2 Originally painted as evidence and testimony in a land-litigation trial, the map catalogues the size and ownership of numerous properties in the vicinity of Tetzcoco. The painter-scribe defines each plot as either transferable ...

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3: Our Kin, Our Blood

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pp. 95-128

With these words, don Carlos Ometochtzin Chichimecatecatl is said to have advocated rebellion against the recently arrived Spaniards.1 The men whom don Carlos here evokes, scions of the Mexica royal dynasty, are his kin. Yoanizi refers to don Diego de Alvarado Huanitzin, a grandson of Axayacatl, the sixth tlahtoani of Tenochtitlan (r. 1469–1481), and a nephew of Motecuhzoma II Xocoyotzin...

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4: Telling Stories

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pp. 129-160

Like all historical writing, the iconic-script histories of pre-Hispanic Mexico written in the Early Colonial Period satisfied economic, political, and social needs—not only for Spanish but also for indigenous patrons.1 In the aftermath of the execution of don Carlos Ometochtzin Chichimecatecatl, and in response to the erosion of indigenous political autonomy...

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CONCLUSION: IN THE PALACE OF NEZAHUALCOYOTL [Contains Image Plates]

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pp. 161-192

Around 1453, three years into the Great Famine that scourged the Valley of Mexico, Nezahualcoyotl, the ruler of Tetzcoco, had a palace and gardens built on the sacred hill of Tetzcotzinco.1 According to the Codex Xolotl’s first page/map (Plate 1), the king’s great-great-great-grandfather Nopaltzin had once surveyed the eastern valley from the hill’s summit. ...

NOTES

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pp. 193-236

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 237-248

INDEX

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pp. 249-264