Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xiii

This book is a slightly expanded version of my doctoral thesis. In writing this book I have garnered many debts. I wish first to thank my former supervisors, Associate Professor Bill Ashcroft and Dr Sue Kossew of the School of English, the University of New South Wales, for their inspirational blend of academic engagement; I have adopted many of ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-11

Edward Said, in his seminal work Orientalism (1978), maintained that all representations are in some sense misrepresentations: the real issue is whether indeed there can be a true representation of anything, or whether any and all representations, because they are representations, are embedded first in the language and then in the ...

read more

1. Representation and Indigenous Subjectivity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 12-28

This chapter examines issues of representation and the construction of indigenous subjectivity in colonial discourse. The struggle over the representation of person and place that has occurred in the erasure and reinscription of the Papua New Guinean subject and landscape serves as a model for the struggle over colonialist representation in ...

read more

2. Locating the Subject: The Indigenous Construction of Place

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-48

For indigenous people the representation of place is essentially a discourse of landownership. The definition of the term “landownership” for Papua New Guineans must encompass the complexity of their relationship with their natural and social environment. In the understanding of indigenous people, “land” and “place” cannot be separated. Land/place ...

read more

3. Colonizing Location: Representing Colonial Space

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-88

This chapter discusses European representation of colonial Papua New Guinea space. It argues that imperial engagement with Papua New Guinean society is, on one significant level, a struggle over the representation of place. The previous discussion of indigenous representations of place provides us with a model for the operation of colonial ...

read more

4. Colonial Representation and Legal Discourse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-99

This chapter discusses how Papua New Guineans have been depicted in colonial legal discourse. While colonialism deploys numerous representational strategies, legal discourse was crucial in Papua New Guinea in geographically and socially segregating the races. An examination of some of the laws and regulations instituted under colonial rule demonstrates ...

read more

5. The Subject as Child

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 100-123

The strategy of infantilization is common in colonial discourse and is associated closely with the concept of the primitive and the subject status of the races of empire. Through these representations and associated tropes such as the uneducable native and “fuzzy wuzzy angel,” colonial authority as “parent,” “teacher,” and “ruler” is maintained. ...

read more

6. The Subject as Savage

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 124-139

This chapter discusses the representation of the Papua New Guinean as savage. Besides interrelating with the trope of the PNG subject as child (the focus of chapter 5), the savage trope involves notions of primitivity and debasement. As Gail Ching-Liang Low asserted: “The segregation of native reality from colonial reality is based on a temporal ...

read more

7. The Sexualized Native Body

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 140-161

This chapter is concerned with the sexualization of the Papua New Guinean body in the European imagination. The construction of the native body as an object of both desire and revulsion suggests that the body may be seen as a potent metaphor for culture. The ambivalence of colonialist representation pivots on the contradictory tropes of debasement ...

read more

8. Writing Ourselves: Cultural Self-Representation in Contemporary Papua New Guinean Literature

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 162-188

For all the power and universality of colonial strategies of representation, the representation of Papua New Guineans has not been unilateral. Indigenous people have not been passive recipients but rather have constantly engaged the images of place and subjectivity provided by colonial discourse, along with the technologies, such as writing, ...

read more

9. Writing Ourselves II: Representing the Post-Independence Papua New Guinea Landscape

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-204

This chapter argues that, while maintaining a correspondence with themes and concerns expressed before national independence, the indigenous imaginings of Papua New Guinea since 1970 have become more complex. Indeed, PNG self-representation has traversed new sociopolitical and cultural boundaries. Like the literatures of other ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-210

As this study has shown, postcolonial representation is a site of continuing struggle between competing discourses grounded in different ideologies, preconceptions, and philosophies. Colonialist discourse demonstrated its ubiquitous coercive power in all forms of representative practice, with the same tropes occurring in both fictional and ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-212

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-234

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-242