Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Note on the Romanization Systems Used in This Work

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

Upon completion of this biographical study of Min Yŏng-hwan, I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to all those who have assisted me along the way. In particular I would like to thank my former supervisor at the Oriental Instititute at the University of Oxford, Dr. James B. Lewis, for his sound guidance and encouragement throughout the four years ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

The original motivation behind this biographical study of the late Chosŏn offcial Min Yŏng-hwan came from an interest in Min’s aunt Queen Myŏngsŏng (Queen Min), the consort of King Kojong. Even a casual visitor to Seoul is likely to visit Kyŏngbok Palace and come across the site of her miserable death on 8 October 1895. In the precincts of this royal palace she was brutally ...

read more

1. Early lifeand Political Career

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-38

To understand the course of Min Yŏng-hwan’s life, which culminated in his suicide in 1905 at the age of forty-four, it is necessary to be aware of the immense changes that were taking place in Northeast Asia during the fifty-year period from 1860 to 1910. These changes, which have been described by Martina ...

read more

2. Proposals for Reform

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-71

To understand the full significance of Min Yŏng-hwan’s major extant essay on reform, Ch’ŏnilch’aek,1 it is first necessary to solve the problem of when it was actually composed. The original text itself is undated, and no mention is made of its date of composition by the compilers of Min Ch’ung jŏnggong yugo. As the second section ...

read more

3. Mission to Russia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-114

Before examining Min Yŏng-hwan’s mission to Russia in 1896, it is worth taking a cursory view of the evolution of Russo-Korean relations during the preceding decades. Since 1864, twenty years before the signing of the first Russian- Korean treaty on 7 July 1884, Russia had made numerous unsuccessful efforts to establish trade relations ...

read more

4. Embassy to Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-154

On 20 September 1896, even before his return from Russia, Min was appointed a minister in the State Council (Ŭijŏngbu ch’anjŏng),1 and on 12 November, soon after his return to Seoul, he was appointed minister of war.2This second appointment was apparently at the prompting of the Russian military adviser Colonel Putiata, who had gained a favorable impression of Min during the journey ...

read more

5 The Final Phase

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-182

After leaving Britain in July 1897, Min Yŏng-hwan traveled directly to the United States and spent almost a year in Washington, D.C., where, according to the Independent, he stayed together with Min Sang-ho and Min Yŏng-ch’an at “the Hamilton House.”1 To avoid the displeasure of King Kojong and possible punishment if he returned to Seoul, Min Yŏng-hwan and his colleagues ...

Appendix 1. Min’s Family Tree

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 183

Appendix 2. English-Language Works on the Late Chosŏn Era

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-187

Appendix 3. Diplomatic Correspondence and Dispatches

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-193

Appendix 4. Min’s Telegrams to King Kojong on His Departure from Europe in 18971

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 195

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 197-224

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-234

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-243

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-256