In this Book

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy
summary
In November 1937, Ishii Itaro, head of the Japanese Foreign Ministry's Bureau of Asiatic Affairs, reflected bitterly on the decline of the ministry's influence in China and his own long and debilitating struggle to guide China policy. Ishii was the most notable member of a group of middle-level diplomats who, having served in China, strongly advocated that Japan adopt policies in harmony with China's rising nationalism and national interests. Japan's Imperial Diplomacy profiles this distinct strain of "China service diplomat," while providing a comprehensive look at the institutional history and internal dynamics of the Japanese Foreign Ministry and its handling of China affairs in the years leading up to and through World War II. Moving from a thorough examination of a wide range of primary sources, including the extensive archives of the Japanese Foreign Ministry, memoirs, diaries, and unpublished speeches, Japan's Imperial Diplomacy offers integrated interpretations of Japanese imperialism, diplomacy, and the bureaucratic restructuring of the 1930s that were fundamental to Japan's version of fascism and the move toward war. Specialists of China, Japan, comparative colonialism, and World War II diplomacy will find this well-conceived and carefully researched and organized work of first-rate importance to the understanding of modern Japanese history in general and Japanese imperialism in particular.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xi
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-14
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  1. 1 The Rise of Kasumigaseki Diplomacy: The Struggle for Autonomy
  2. pp. 15-44
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  1. 2 The Development of the Career Diplomat: Nurturing China Expertise
  2. pp. 45-78
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  1. 3 The Japanese Consul in China
  2. pp. 79-116
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  1. 4 The Gaimushō’s Loss in the Manchurian Incident
  2. pp. 117-159
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  1. 5 The Path to War: The Gaimushō’s Continuing Loss of Control in China Affairs
  2. pp. 160-207
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 208-213
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 215-261
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 263-280
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 281-296
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