In this Book

Japan's Competing Modernities
summary
Scholars, Japanese and non-Japanese alike, have studied the greater Taisho era (1900-1930) within the framework of Taisho demokurashii (democracy). While this concept has proved useful, students of the period in more recent years have sought alternative ways of understanding the late Meiji-Taisho period. This collection of essays, each based on new research, offers original insights into various aspects of modern Japanese cultural history from "modernist" architecture to women as cultural symbols, popular songs to the rhetoric of empire-building, and more. The volume is organized around three general topics: geographical and cultural space; cosmopolitanism and national identity; and diversity, autonomy, and integration. Within these the authors have identified a number of thematic tensions that link the essays: high and low culture in cultural production and dissemination; national and ethnic identities; empire and ethnicity; the center and the periphery; naichi (homeland) and gaichi (overseas); urban and rural; public and private; migration and barriers. The volume opens up new avenues of exploration for the study of modern Japanese history and culture. If, as one of the authors contends, the imperative is " to understand more fully the historical forces that made Japan what it is today," these studies of Japan's "competing modernities" point the way to answers to some of the country's most challenging historical questions in this century.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xiii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-21
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  1. I. Geographical and Cultural Space
  2. p. 23
  1. 1. Peopling the Japanese Empire: The Koreans in Manchuria and the Rhetoric of Inclusion
  2. pp. 25-44
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  1. 2. Integrating into Chinese Society: A Comparison of the Japanese Communities of Shanghai and Harbin
  2. pp. 45-69
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  1. 3. Space and Aesthetic Imagination in Some Taishō Writings
  2. pp. 70-90
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  1. 4. The City and the Countryside: Competing Taishō “Modernities” on Gender
  2. pp. 91-113
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  1. 5. Naturalizing Nationhood: Ideology and Practice in Early Twentieth-Century Japan
  2. pp. 114-132
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  1. 6. Asano Wasaburō and Japanese Spiritualism in Early Twentieth-Century Japan
  2. pp. 133-153
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  1. II. Cosmopolitanism and National Identity
  2. p. 155
  1. 7. Becoming Japanese: Imperial Expansion and Identity Crises in the Early Twentieth Century
  2. pp. 157-180
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  1. 8. Culture, Ethnicity, and the State in Early Twentieth-Century Japan
  2. pp. 181-205
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  1. 9. Writing the National Narrative: Changing Attitudes toward Nation-Building among Japanese Writers, 1900–1930
  2. pp. 206-227
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  1. 10. The Bunriha and the Problem of “Tradition” for Modernist Architecture in Japan, 1920–1928
  2. pp. 228-246
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  1. 11. Defining the Modern Nation in Japanese Popular Song, 1914–1932
  2. pp. 247-264
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  1. III. Diversity, Autonomy, and Integration
  2. p. 265
  1. 12. Media Culture in Taishō Osaka
  2. pp. 267-287
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  1. 13. Zaikai and Taishō Demokurashii, 1900–1930
  2. pp. 288-311
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  1. 14. Fashioning a Culture of Diligence and Thrift: Savings and Frugality Campaigns in Japan, 1900–1931
  2. pp. 312-334
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  1. 15. Visions of Women and the New Society in Conflict: Yamakawa Kikue versus Takamure Itsue
  2. pp. 335-357
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  1. 16. Broadcasting in Korea, 1924–1937: Colonial Modernity and Cultural Hegemony
  2. pp. 358-378
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 379-381
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 383-394
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