Cover, Copyright and Title Pages

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-12

On February 1, 1902, T. Thomas Fortune, the mercurial African American editor of the New York Age newspaper, slipped a bit of gossip into his letter to Booker T. Washington. Wedged between weighty paragraphs on “race” issues was a juicy...

read more

Chapter 1: The Child Is Father of the Man

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-43

One day in 1883, eleven-year-old Paul Laurence Dunbar sat down to write yet another poem.1 Since the age of six, he had been “rhyming,” as he described his juvenile craft. His inspiration came from verses in his first-grade McGuffy Reader, especially those by the British Poet Laureate, William Wordsworth.2 ...

read more

Chapter 2: To Escape the Reproach of Her Birth and Blood

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-73

Even before they met, an infatuated Paul Laurence Dunbar would write Alice Ruth Moore (1875–1935) that he loved her and had loved her since seeing her photograph in the April 1895 issue of the Boston Monthly Review magazine.1 ...

read more

Chapter 3: The Wooing

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-111

“The Wooing” is a whimsical summary of the courtship of Paul and Alice.1 It proceeded as sketched in his poem. Paul saw a photograph of Alice—his maiden fair—with hazel eyes and auburn hair. He fell in love with this image, and the love was unrequited. ...

read more

Chapter 4: One Damned Night of Folly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 112-145

A betrothal exacted different prices from the betrothed, depending on gender. During this rehearsal period for marriage, the woman of that time altered her life and began assuming the subservience prescribed for wives. She was expected to relinquish ambitions for worldly achievement, and to prepare for her preordained occupational roles of home-...

read more

Chapter 5: Parted

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-175

As Mrs. Paul Laurence Dunbar, Alice embraced the companionate ideals of marriage, writing them into barely disguised short stories about her marriage to Paul. In Alice’s “Ellen Fenton,” a long-suffering wife finds happiness only when she and her emotionally distant husband become “real companions and comrades.”1 ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 176-180

The nature of courtship and marriage defies precise explanations. Love, mate selection, and decisions made regarding a relationship are often unfathomable to the outsider. This may be especially true of one examining a romantic liaison from another century. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-223

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-238

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-241

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 243