Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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CONTENTS

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p. vii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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p. ix

PART ONE

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1. Overview

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pp. 1-9

Every year, several hundred thousand unrepresented American employees are discharged without good cause. Millions more are laid off by companies that transfer their production jobs to lower wage facilities in the South or in Mexico and other developing countries. When employees...

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2. The Historical Foundation of American Labor

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pp. 10-33

During the Colonial period, there were relatively few free workers.1 The great majority of laborers were either slaves or indentured servants. As trade and commerce expanded, there was an increased demand for unconstrained workers. Skilled craftsmen who established small...

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3. The Extent and Causes of the Decline of the American Labor Movement

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pp. 34-55

Union membership figures have generally fluctuated over time due to the impact of economic cycles, industrial changes, immigration patterns, and other relevant factors. Between 1897 and 1904, trade union membership increased from 447,000 to over 2,000,000.1 By 1920, labor...

PART TWO

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4. The Need for Labor Unions to Organize Traditionally Nonunion Personnel

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pp. 59-88

The American labor movement has historically derived its organizational strength from northern blue-collar workers. As demographic and structural changes continue to deplete the ranks of these workers and to expand the traditionally unorganized sectors of the workforce, labor unions...

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5. Enhancing Organized Labor's Economic and Political Power

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pp. 89-125

Employees who select a bargaining agent under the NLRA are guaranteed negotiating rights with respect to issues pertaining to wages, hours, and conditions of employment. While their representative labor organization may insist upon negotiations concerning these "mandatory"...

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6. The Need to Reform the National Labor Relations Act

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pp. 126-155

Throughout the first 150 years of its existence, the United States officially discouraged collective worker action. When individual employees joined forces with other workers, they were subject to antitrust or criminal conspiracy liability.1 Courts did not hesitate to enjoin such collective efforts.2...

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EPILOGUE

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pp. 156-157

Over the past two centuries, the American labor movement has demonstrated remarkable resiliency. Throughout the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, craft guilds flourished despite the absence of legislative support. During the second half of the nineteenth century...

NOTES

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pp. 159-188

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 189-201

TABLE OF CASES

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pp. 202-205

INDEX

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pp. 207-213