Cover

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Copyright

CONTENTS

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List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Late at night on August 17, 1962, Robert Parris Moses returned to a deserted Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) office in Greenwood, Mississippi, that had just been ransacked by a white mob. Hours earlier three...

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1. "A Lot of Leaders"

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pp. 9-19

Robert Parris Moses was born on January 23, 1935, and raised in Harlem, New York City. His grandfather, William Henry Moses, was a charismatic Baptist preacher who traveled throughout the South raising funds for the National Baptist Convention. William Moses was educated at Virginia Seminary...

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2. "To 'Uncover What Is Covered' "

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pp. 20-31

Twenty-five year-old Robert Moses arrived by bus in Georgia early in the summer of 1960 to find only three full-time workers in the Atlanta SCLC headquarters. The office was in transition, the publicity-seeking Wyatt Tee Walker replacing...

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3. "This Is Mississippi, the Middle of the Iceberg"

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pp. 32-70

After Labor Day 1960 Moses returned to New York to his father's apartment and his teaching contract at the Horace Mann School in Riverdale. Late in the spring of 1961, he left for the South, honoring a commitment to work for SNCC...

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4. "Food for Those Who Want to Be Free"

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pp. 71-88

Mississippi was the hardest state for the civil rights movement to crack. It therefore offered the cause its greatest prize. In the early spring of 1962, SNCC workers resumed the drive to register the poor to vote, this time targeting the heavy black population in six counties of the Mississippi...

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5. "One Man-One Vote"

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pp. 89-103

The plodding zigzag efforts of the Justice Department frustrated and discouraged SNCC workers. This contributed to a heightened radicalism within the growing group...

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6. Young American Revolutionaries

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pp. 104-132

On Easter weekend 1963, at SNCC's fourth annual conference, Moses gave a speech outlining his plans for continuing voter registration in Mississippi's Delta. The need was for Ii not five hundred but five thousand" blacks to register to vote, but SNCC must realize that it was confronting a white monolith...

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7. Freedom Summer

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pp. 133-168

The Freedom Vote in the fall of 1963 was one victory for Robert Moses and his co-workers. The movement needed whatever victories it could get. Registration of blacks by mid-1963 was about three percent of all voters in the state; of all eligible blacks...

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8. "To Bring Morality into Our Politics"

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pp. 169-199

The initial phase of the Freedom Summer-voter registration drives, Freedom Schools, and the like-had failed to bring Washington to the Mississippi battle lines. SNCC workers hoped that the next phase, the attempt to seat Mississippi Freedom Democratic party delegates at the Democratic National...

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9. Disillusion and Renewal

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pp. 200-224

Beginning in the fall of 1964 Moses increasingly distanced himself from the organizational and policy discussions within SNCC. James Forman, SNCC's executive director, attributes this to the "almost Jesuslike aura that he [Moses] and his name had acquired." 1 Yet Moses worked with Forman to shape a plan for the following summer that they called the Black Belt Program...

Notes

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pp. 225-284

Index

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pp. 285-293