In this Book

Corporate Power in Civil Society
summary

The corporate mega-mergers of the 1980s and 1990s raise many troubling questions for social scientists and legal scholars. Do corporate globalism and the new, streamlined corporation help or hinder the development of civil society? Does the new power that increasingly deregulated businesses wield undermine the rights of citizens, or is this threat being exaggerated? Who has the authority to get things done in a corporation's name and who can be held legally responsible for a corporation's misbehavior? What role, if any, should the courts play in strengthening the rights of individuals who challenge the actions of big business?

David Sciulli maps the legal limits of corporate power in our democratic society, and explores the role of the corporate judiciary in creating public policy. He argues that the judiciary must be more vigilant and act to curb corporate abuses. He demonstrates that when corporations exercise their private power in civil society, they are just as capable as the state of exercising it in ways that are dangerous, arbitrary, and challenge the basic institutional arrangements of society. Finally, Sciulli calls for sociologists to involve themselves more deeply in issues of corporate governance and commit their discipline to influencing the decisions of the courts.

Table of Contents

  1. Frontmatter
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. v
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-7
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Corporations and Civil Society: Institutional Externalities of Corporate Power
  2. pp. 8-30
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. The Turbulence of the 1980s
  2. pp. 31-57
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. I. Overview and Background
  2. p. 59
  1. 3. Contractarians and Imposers
  2. pp. 61-82
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Contractarians and Balancers
  2. pp. 83-96
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Major Delaware Decisions of the 1980s and 1990s
  2. pp. 97-128
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. II. Sources of Judicial Drift
  2. p. 129
  1. 6. Why Contractarians Fail to Explain Judicial Behavior
  2. pp. 131-144
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Why Imposers Fail to Explain Judicial Behavior
  2. pp. 145-162
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Legislative Action: Stakeholder Balancing and Its Limits
  2. pp. 163-186
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Contractarian Reaction: Opting Out
  2. pp. 187-203
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. III. Corporate Law and Judicial Practice in a Global Economy
  2. p. 205
  1. 10. America’s Constitutional Court forIntermediary Associations
  2. pp. 207-229
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. Beyond the Failures: A Threshold of Procedural Norms
  2. pp. 230-258
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. Time-Warner and Institutional Externalities: From Culture to Form
  2. pp. 259-281
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Explaining and Predicting Judicial Behavior in a Global Economy
  2. pp. 282-311
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 313-373
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. References
  2. pp. 375-397
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 399-406
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. About the Author
  2. p. 407
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.