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The Culture and Commerce of the Early American Novel
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Taking his cue from Philadelphia-born novelist Charles Brockden Brown’s Annals of Europe and America, which contends that America is shaped most noticeably by the international struggle between Great Britain and France for control of the world trade market, Stephen Shapiro charts the advent, decline, and reinvigoration of the early American novel. That the American novel “sprang so unexpectedly into published existence during the 1790s” may be a reflection of the beginning of the end of Franco-British supremacy and of the power of a middle class riding the crest of a new world economic system. Shapiro’s world-systems approach is a relatively new methodology for literary studies, but it brings two particularly useful features to the table. First, it refines the conceptual frameworks for analyzing cultural and social history, such as the rise in sentimentalism, in relation to a long-wave economic history of global commerce; second, it fosters a new model for a comparative American studies across time. Rather than relying on contiguous time, a world-systems approach might compare the cultural production of one region to another at the same location within the recurring cycle in an economic reconfiguration. Shapiro offers a way of thinking about the causes for the emergence of the American novel that suggests a fresh approach to the paradigms shaping American studies.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. vii
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  1. 1: method and misperception: the paradigm problem of the early american novel
  2. pp. 1-50
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  1. 2: The Geoculture of the Anglo-French Eighteenth-Century World-System
  2. pp. 51-95
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  1. 3: The Re-export Republic and the Rise of the Early American Novel
  2. pp. 97-167
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  1. 4: The Paradox of the Public Sphere: Franklin’s Autobiography and the Institution of Ideology
  2. pp. 169-208
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  1. 5: Wieland and the Problem of Counterinstitutionality
  2. pp. 209-257
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  1. 6: Arthur Mervyn and the Racial Revolution of Narrative Consciousness
  2. pp. 259-299
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  1. Afterword: Early Nineteenth-Century American Studies and the World-Systems Perspective
  2. pp. 301-304
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 305-349
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 351-371
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  1. Back Cover
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