In this Book

The Burke-Wollstonecraft Debate
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
Many modern conservatives and feminists trace the roots of their ideologies, respectively, to Edmund Burke (1729–1797) and Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797), and a proper understanding of these two thinkers is therefore important as a framework for political debates today.According to Daniel O’Neill, Burke is misconstrued if viewed as mainly providing a warning about the dangers of attempting to turn utopian visions into political reality, while Wollstonecraft is far more than just a proponent of extending the public sphere rights of man to include women. Rather, at the heart of their differences lies a dispute over democracy as a force tending toward savagery (Burke) or toward civilization (Wollstonecraft). Their debate over the meaning of the French Revolution is the place where these differences are elucidated, but the real key to understanding what this debate is about is its relation to the intellectual tradition of the Scottish Enlightenment, whose language of politics provided the discursive framework within and against which Burke and Wollstonecraft developed their own unique ideas about what was involved in the civilizing process.

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-20
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1 The Scottish Enlightenment, the Moral Sense, and the Civilizing Process
  2. pp. 21-50
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2 Burke and the Scottish Enlightenment
  2. pp. 51-88
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3 Wollstonecraft and the Scottish Enlightenment
  2. pp. 89-124
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4 "The Most Important of all Revolutions"
  2. pp. 125-156
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5 Vindicating a Revolution in Morals and Manners
  2. pp. 157-194
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6 Burke on Democracy as the Death of Western Civilization
  2. pp. 195-226
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7 Wollstonecraft on Democracy as the Birth of Western Civilization
  2. pp. 227-256
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 257-262
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 263-276
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 277-291
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Back Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.