Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Front Matter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xi

I received invaluable help on this book from numerous individuals, and I would like to thank them. I would also like to thank the many institutions whose resources enabled me to do research on Peter and Fanny Gulick. At the outset of my research, I contacted many of the couple’s living descendents, asking them for permission to use their family’s papers at Harvard...

read more

INTRODUCTION

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-11

Of all the reform-minded families in American history, few were more active than the Gulicks. A large clan of Dutch origin, the Gulicks (pronounced Gyew-licks) are probably best known in the United States today as the founders of the Camp Fire Girls. But the family used to be known mainly for their Protestant missionary work, which they did for a remarkably long...

read more

1. PETER GULICK, FANNY THOMAS, AND THE PARTHIAN

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 12-34

For most of their history, the native inhabitants of Hawai‘i lived in a relatively isolated state, but this began to change when the English explorer Captain James Cook “discovered” the Sandwich Islands, as he called them, in 1778. Other Westerners soon made their way to the islands, and they brought guns, some of which ended up in the hands of a powerful Hawaiian...

read more

2. WAI-MEA

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-53

When the Gulicks moved to Wai-mea, Kaua‘i, they encountered thousands of Hawaiians in the area (whose population was 3,883 in 1833). They also found the village to be “a hot, dry, red, dusty, and desolate place,” because it was shut off by the mountains of Kaua‘i from moisture- bearing trade winds. Without those winds, Wai-mea struck the Gulicks’ son Orramel as “the...

read more

3. KŌ-LOA

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-76

Described by the Gulicks’ son Luther as “one of the pleasantest localities on those diamond-isles” of Hawai‘i, the village of Kō-loa, Kaua‘i, was well known for its sugarcane. Brought to Hawai‘i by the islands’ first settlers around 800 A.D., sugarcane grew naturally in Kō-loa (which means “Great Cane”), because the village received plenty of rainfall. It also boasted “fields...

read more

4. MOLOKA‘I

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-85

When the Gulicks arrived in the village of Ka-lua-‘aha in 1843, they found it much different from their former station, Kō-loa. There commerce flourished and freshwater was plentiful. But neither of those things abounded in Ka-lua-‘aha, which was the only station of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) on the rugged, mountainous island...

read more

5. WAI-A-LUA

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-115

Throughout their stay in the Wai-a-lua district of O‘ahu, the Gulicks lived in the country, but their house was only a third of a mile “as a bird flies” from the village of Hale-‘iwa, which was on the south side of the Anahulu River. On the north side of the river was the Gulicks’ land, where the family lived from 1846 to 1856. During that time, they enjoyed the “very pleasant”...

read more

6. HONOLULU

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-144

The Gulicks moved to the outskirts of Honolulu, Hawai‘i’s capital, in 1856, and they lived there for the next eighteen years. During that time, Honolulu expanded rapidly, and today it encompasses the site where the Gulicks built their house. When the house was built, however, it lay two miles outside of Honolulu in an area called Makiki, which was separated from the capital by...

read more

7. JAPAN

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-152

When Peter and Fanny moved to the empire of Japan in 1874, they fully expected to die there, and they thought that death would come very shortly. But Peter lived in Japan for three years, and Fanny lived there for nine years. For most of that time, she lived on Kobe Hill in the city of Kobe, but initially she and Peter lived in Osaka, which was one of Japan’s “treaty ports...

read more

CONCLUSION

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-161

Peter and Fanny Gulick were a remarkable couple, and they led historically important lives. At first they seemed destined to live prosaically in the United States, but they got caught up in the reformatory fervor of the Second Great Awakening, which inspired them to become Christian missionaries. As such they proselytized for nearly five decades in Hawai‘i, where in spite of their...

ABBREVIATIONS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-164

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-198

BIBLIOGRAPHY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-207

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-218

Image Plates

pdf iconDownload PDF