Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book would not have been possible without the help and support of many people. l owe enormous gratitude to my graduate school professors at UCLA. In particular, I want to thank Frank Gilliam for his commitment to this project and for the numerous hours he invested in reading its earliest incarnations. He is a...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

In 1993 Richard Riordan, a white Republican from Los Angeles's affluent Westside, beat his Democratic opponent, Michael Woo, to become the first Republican mayor of Los Angeles in over thirty years. Woo, an incumbent city councilman from the liberal West Hollywood district, was expected to win. In a city where Democrats...

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1. Constructing a Theory of Local Voting Behavior

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pp. 9-35

The most commonly accepted theories of voting-at the level of presidential, gubernatorial, Senate, and House elections-point to the importance of party identification to voter choice. In most forms of American electoral politics, partisanship is a major force (Stein 1990; Kahn and Kenney 1999; Bartels 2000; Jacobson 2001). Yet local...

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2. Group Interest Theory and Local Elections

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pp. 37-60

Politics do not occur in a vacuum, and most political scientists acknowledge that social and political contexts influence behavior (Key 1949; Berelson, Lazarsfeld, and McPhee 1954; Nie, Verba, and Petrocik 1976; Huckfeldt 1986; Iyengar 1991; Jones 1994; Huckfeldt and Sprague 1995; Kinder and Mendelberg 1995; Hero...

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3. From Rioting to Watergate: Los Angeles, 1969 and 1973

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pp. 61-86

The 1969 and 1973 Los Angeles mayoral elections represent an ideal set of elections within which to test the group interest expectation that conflict makes racial interests salient to voting. The 1969 mayoral election in Los Angeles featured a conservative incumbent Democrat, Sam Yorty, against a more liberal black Democrat, Tom...

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4. "Tough Enough to Turn L.A. Around": Los Angeles, 1973 to 1993

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pp. 87-118

Tom Bradley's election in 1973 was considered historic, as he was the first black mayor in a large American city to be elected by a predominantly white electorate. As impressive as his 1973 victory was at the time, his twenty-year mayoralty was further evidence of his appeal to voters of all racial and ethnic groups. Unlike voters in other large...

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5. "Vote Your Hopes, Not Your Fears": New York, 1965 to 1993

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pp. 119-150

The political flavor of New York City mayoral politics is in many ways a sharp departure from that of Los Angeles. In New York, racial, ethnic, and religious identities have always played an important role in the city's governance and its electoral politics. Although the contemporary dividing lines in New York City have shifted away from the...

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6. Racial Conflict and Retrospective Voting

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pp. 151-166

Republican mayors Rudolph Giuliani and Richard Riordan took office during periods of enormous economic and racial strife, double- digit unemployment, and skyrocketing crime rates. By their reelection campaigns in 1997, however, both mayors had experienced considerable success. Reductions in crime, shrinking...

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7. Down but Not Out: A Liberal Revival in 2001

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pp. 167-193

By 2001 the political context in New York and Los Angeles had changed considerably. Sustained economic growth in both cities resulted in new jobs, municipal solvency, and diminished public concern over crime. The palpable racial conflict of the earlier period had largely subsided, except for continuing episodes of police misconduct...

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8. Changing Urban Politics in the New Millennium

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pp. 195-207

If there is one thing we know for certain about the shape of urban politics in the years to come, it is that change will be its most defining feature. Large American cities have undergone profound demographic transformations over the past fifty years. Southern black migration to many urban centers, suburban white flight, large...

Appendix

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pp. 209-214

Bibliography

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pp. 215-234

Index

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pp. 235-248