Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Introduction: Socratizing Pedagogy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-12

The Pedagogical Contract is in many senses a counterintuitive book. It argues that pedagogy ideally must ignore the imperatives of the conventional marketplace - for relevance, utility, and productivity - because teaching and learning...

read more

1. The Pedagogical Contract

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-36

The pedagogical scenario is embodied by teacher and student. This chapter examines how rhetorics of materiality - of the body, of money, of gain, of loss - subtend the originary narratives of pedagogy, only to be violently abnegated...

read more

2. The "Disinterest" of Social Contract

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-62

The sophistic contract presents teachers as objects of suspicion, but it is not the only iconography of the teacher-student relationship. In this chapter I want to contextualize the iconography of the sophistic or materialistic...

read more

3. The Economy of Desire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-87

One of the points that antiquity has to make to us is that an education cannot simply be bought, because its processes and knowledge cannot be crudely exchanged for material wealth. If the aristocratic class supported...

read more

4. Teaching Out of Context

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-117

There is a sense in which any cultural activity is worthwhile only because the community - the activity's consumers, in a rhetoric of commodification - believes that it has value. By analogy, any cultural activity is useless because...

read more

5. The Ends of Pedagogy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-143

The preceding chapters looked at the dynamics that structure and feed the pedagogical scenario; this final chapter of the book explores the ways in which pedagogy requires any relationship between teachers and students to have...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-147

... and so, as far as this book is concerned, the teacher does not ever disappear from the pedagogical scenario. Among other figures from antiquity, the sophists, Protagoras, Hippias, Prometheus, and above all, Socrates return to teach us in their various...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-159

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-172

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-176