Covers

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

FM

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-ix

EVERYONE KNOWS WHERE BABIES COME FROM. The same cannot be said for men. Presumably they come from babies. The standard recipe is rather vague: just add time. The theorists of ancient oratory were not content to sit by idly and to wait for nature to take its...

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xi

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-28

WHAT DID ANCIENT ORATORY LOOK LIKE? This study started with this question, but it does not end by answering it with a collection of bodily facts. I offer neither a catalog of gestures nor a script to be used for reproducing the ancient orator. At least, I hope...

read more

CHAPTER 1: Reading and Writing

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-58

ANCIENT RHETORICAL THEORISTS TEND TO RECOGNIZE five branches of study requisite to the proper study of the art. While some Greeks may have divided the question up differently,1 the Latin tradition is marked...

read more

CHAPTER 2: Discovering the Body

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-86

AN ORATOR MUST STUDY DELIVERY. 1 In order to perform effectively, the orator needs to have a thorough knowledge of every physical aspect of performance: vocal qualities, movements, even dress and grooming. In the process of acquiring this knowledge, the orator...

read more

CHAPTER 3: Self-Mastery

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-110

QUINTlLIAN OPENS HIS INSTITUTIO ORATORIA with a confession that his work does not aspire to novelty. Indeed, many of the finest minds of both Greece and Rome have already treated oratory in great detail (l.pr.l). And while Quintilian despairs of being able to...

read more

CHAPTER 4: Actors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 111-148

IN THE RHETORICAL TRADITION THE ACTOR is a vexed character.1 Sometimes he serves as a point of comparison when discussing the orator's own performance; elsewhere he is an example of behavior to be avoided.2 This doubling of the actor makes him a figure who...

read more

CHAPTERS 5: Pleasure

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-186

IN SEVERAL OF THE PRECEDING CHAPTERS, the orator has constructed himself via an aggressive relationship to his own body and soul and to the bodies and souls of others. This relationship allows him to establish himself as himself in vigorous contradistinction to a...

read more

CHAPTER 6: Love

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-222

THIS CHAPTER BRINGS US BACK to the problems of reading, writing, and textuality that we took up in the first chapter. At the same time, this will be the occasion for seeing the good body and good...

read more

Conclusion:We Other Romans

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-230

I WISH TO END WITH A READING of a reading of rhetoric. I have chosen as an example a piece by a leading scholar on Roman oratory. This essay is worth reading because its author is the master of a prevalent scholarly mode that others often only imperfectly execute...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-250

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-260

General Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-266

Index Locorum

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-271