In this Book

Staging Philosophy
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summary
The fifteen original essays in Staging Philosophy make useful connections between the discipline of philosophy and the fields of theater and performance and use these insights to develop new theories about theater. Each of the contributors—leading scholars in the fields of performance and philosophy—breaks new ground, presents new arguments, and offers new theories that will pave the way for future scholarship. Staging Philosophy raises issues of critical importance by providing case studies of various philosophical movements and schools of thought, including aesthetics, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, deconstruction, critical realism, and cognitive science. The essays, which are organized into three sections—history and method, presence, and reception—take up fundamental issues such as spectatorship, empathy, ethics, theater as literature, and the essence of live performance. While some essays challenge assertions made by critics and historians of theater and performance, others analyze the assumptions of manifestos that prescribe how practitioners should go about creating texts and performances. The first book to bridge the disciplines of theater and philosophy, Staging Philosophy will provoke, stimulate, engage, and ultimately bring theater to the foreground of intellectual inquiry while it inspires further philosophical investigation into theater and performance. David Krasner is Associate Professor of Theater Studies, African American Studies, and English at Yale University. His books include A Beautiful Pageant: African American Theatre, Drama, and Performance in the Harlem Renaissance, 1910-1920 and Renaissance, Parody, and Double Consciousness in African American Theatre, 1895-1910. He is co-editor of the series Theater: Theory/Text/Performance. David Z. Saltz is Associate Professor of Theatre Studies and Head of the Department of Theatre and Film Studies at the University of Georgia. He is coeditor of Theater Journal and is the principal investigator of the innovative Virtual Vaudeville project at the University of Georgia.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. iii-v
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-15
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  1. Part 1: History and Method
  2. p. 17
  1. 1. The Text/Performance Split across the Analytic/Continental Divide
  2. pp. 19-40
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  1. 2. Kenneth Burke: Theater, Philosophy, and the Limits of Performance
  2. pp. 41-56
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  1. 3. Critical Realism and Performance Strategies
  2. pp. 57-84
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  1. Part 2: Presence
  2. p. 85
  1. 4. Humanoid Boogie: Reflections on Robotic Performance
  2. pp. 87-103
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  1. 5. Philosophy and Drama: Performance, Interpretation, and Intentionality
  2. pp. 104-121
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  1. 6. Embodiment and Presence: The Ontology of Presence Reconsidered
  2. pp. 122-141
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  1. 7. Presence
  2. pp. 142-159
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  1. 8. Technique
  2. pp. 160-179
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  1. 9. Presenting Objects, Presenting Things
  2. pp. 180-199
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  1. Part 3: Reception
  2. p. 201
  1. 10. Infiction and Outfiction: The Role of Fiction in Theatrical Performance
  2. pp. 203-220
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  1. 11. Understanding Plays
  2. pp. 221-243
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  1. 12. Perception, Action, and Identification in the Theater
  2. pp. 244-254
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  1. 13. Empathy and Theater
  2. pp. 255-277
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  1. 14. The Voice of Blackness: The Black Arts Movement and Logocentrism
  2. pp. 278-300
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  1. 15. Theatricality, Convention, and the Principle of Charity
  2. pp. 301-316
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 317-320
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 321-334
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