In this Book

Emerson in His Own Time
summary
At his death, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804–1864) was universally acknowledged in America and England as “the Great Romancer.” Novels such as The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables and stories published in such collections as Twice-Told Tales continue to capture the minds and imaginations of readers and critics to this day. Harder to capture, however, were the character and personality of the man himself. So few of the essays that appeared in the two years after his death offered new insights into his life, art, and reputation that Hawthorne seemed fated to premature obscurity or, at least, permanent misrepresentation. This first collection of personal reminiscences by those who knew Hawthorne intimately or knew about him through reliable secondary sources rescues him from these confusions and provides the real human history behind the successful writer. 
    Remembrances from Elizabeth Peabody, Sophia Hawthorne, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Bronson Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, and twenty others printed in Hawthorne in His Own Time follow him from his childhood in Salem, through his years of initial literary obscurity, his days in the Boston and Salem Custom Houses, his service as U.S. Consul to Liverpool and Manchester and his life in the Anglo-American communities at Rome and Florence, to his late years as the “Great Romancer.” 
    In their enlightening introduction, editors Ronald Bosco and Jillmarie Murphy assess the postmortem building of Hawthorne’s reputation as well as his relationship to the prominent Transcendentalists, spiritualists, Swedenborgians, and other personalities of his time. By clarifying the sentimental associations between Hawthorne’s writings and his actual personality and moving away from the critical review to the personal narrative, these artful and perceptive reminiscences tell the private and public story of a remarkable life.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. ix-xxxi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chronology
  2. pp. xxxiii-xl
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Amos Bronson Alcott, [A Visit to Emerson at Concord in 1837]
  2. pp. 1-2
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Convers Francis, [Remarks on Emerson in 1838, 1855, and 1858]
  2. pp. 3-9
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Ellis Gray Loring, [A Visit from Emerson in 1838]
  2. pp. 10-11
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. [Annie Sawyer Downs], [Reminiscences of a Childhood in Concord in the 1840s]
  2. pp. 12-15
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Richard Frederick Fuller, “The Younger Generation in 1840 from the Diary of a New England Boy”
  2. pp. 16-20
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. [Margaret Fuller], [At Concord with the Emersons in 1842]
  2. pp. 21-27
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Jane Welsh Carlyle and Thomas Carlyle, [A Visit from Emerson in 1847]
  2. pp. 28-32
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Anonymous, “Emerson as a Lecturer” (1849)
  2. pp. 33-34
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Herman Melville, [Letter to Evert A. Duyckinck about Emerson as a Lecturer] (1849)
  2. pp. 35-37
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Fredrika Bremer, From The Homes of the New World; Impressions of America (1853)
  2. pp. 38-41
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. [Franklin Benjamin Sanborn], “Mr. Emerson’s Lectures” (1864)
  2. pp. 42-45
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. [George William Curtis], [Emerson as Seen from the “Editor’s Easy Chair” in 1865]
  2. pp. 46-48
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Anonymous, “Ralph Waldo Emerson” (1865)
  2. pp. 49-52
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. James Russell Lowell, From My Study Windows (1871)
  2. pp. 53-57
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bronson Alcott, “Fuller,Thoreau, Emerson. . . . The Substance of a ‘Conversation’ ” (1871)
  2. pp. 58-61
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Anna Alcott Pratt, Louisa May Alcott, and Ellen Tucker Emerson, [“House burned,Wednesday, 24 July (1872)”]
  2. pp. 62-69
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Anonymous, “Emerson: A Literary Interview” (1874)
  2. pp. 70-73
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Octavius Brooks Frothingham, From Transcendentalism in New England: A History (1876)
  2. pp. 74-79
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Walt Whitman, From Prose Works 1892 (1881–1882)
  2. pp. 80-83
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Ellen Tucker Emerson, [Emerson’s Death] (1882)
  2. pp. 84-88
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Louisa May Alcott, “Reminiscences of Ralph Waldo Emerson” (1882)
  2. pp. 89-94
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Frederic Henry Hedge, [Reminiscences of Emerson] (1882)
  2. pp. 95-101
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. [Edwin Percy Whipple], “Some Recollections of Ralph Waldo Emerson” (1882)
  2. pp. 102-110
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Julia Ward Howe and Ednah Dow Cheney, From Concord Lectures on Philosophy . . . at the Concord School of Philosophy in 1882
  2. pp. 111-115
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. A. B. Muzzey, From Reminiscences and Memorials of the Men of the Revolution and Their Families (1883)
  2. pp. 116-120
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Oliver Wendell Holmes, From Ralph Waldo Emerson (1884)
  2. pp. 121-127
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Pendleton King, “Notes of Conversations with Emerson” (1884)
  2. pp. 128-135
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. [Annie Adams Fields], “Glimpses of Emerson” (1884)
  2. pp. 136-142
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Frank Bellew, “Recollections of Ralph Waldo Emerson” (1884)
  2. pp. 143-149
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. E. P. Peabody, “Emerson as Preacher” (1885)
  2. pp. 150-156
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Edward Waldo Emerson, Ellen Tucker Emerson, and Edith Emerson Forbes, [Emerson as Remembered by His Children] (1889 and 1897, 1902, 1921)
  2. pp. 157-172
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Charles J. Woodbury, From Talks with Ralph Waldo Emerson (1890)
  2. pp. 173-177
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Francis Espinasse, From Literary Recollections and Sketches (1893)
  2. pp. 178-183
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. William Henry Furness, “Random Reminiscences of Emerson” (1893)
  2. pp. 184-188
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. W. J. Stillman, “The Philosophers’ Camp. Emerson, Agassiz, Lowell, and Others in the Adirondacks” (1893)
  2. pp. 189-194
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. William Dean Howells, “My First Visit to New England” (1894)
  2. pp. 195-199
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Frank Preston Stearns, From Sketches from Concord and Appledore (1895)
  2. pp. 200-208
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Rebecca Harding Davis, “A Little Gossip” (1900)
  2. pp. 209-212
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. John Muir, [Emerson in the Yosemite Valley] (1901)
  2. pp. 213-216
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. William James and Caroline Hazard, From The Centenary of the Birth of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903)
  2. pp. 217-223
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Julian Hawthorne, “Personal Glimpses of Emerson” (1903)
  2. pp. 224-228
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Moncure D. Conway, “Emerson: The Teacher and the Man” (1903)
  2. pp. 229-232
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Daniel Chester French, “A Sculptor’s Reminiscences of Emerson” (1916)
  2. pp. 233-237
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Robert Underwood Johnson, From Remembered Yesterdays (1923)
  2. pp. 238-241
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Kate Douglas Wiggin, From My Garden of Memory: An Autobiography (1923)
  2. pp. 242-247
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Elizabeth Oakes Smith, “Recollections of Emerson, His Household and Friends” (1924)
  2. pp. 248-254
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index [Contains Image Plates]
  2. pp. 255-262
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.