Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

Dream Not of Other Worlds is a memoir about my experience teaching in a segregated “Negro” elementary school in rural Louisa County, Virginia. The year was 1970, and I was a twenty-one-year-old white woman who had never lived in the South and who knew nothing about African American culture. I was my students’ first white...

read more

A Part of Me

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-36

"Of course,” Dr. Martin assured me as he shook my hand, “I don’t expect you to teach those children anything.” Speaking in the soft, courtly drawl of a Virginia gentleman, he emphasized, ever so slightly, the words “those children” so that I would understand and appreciate the unspoken difference between them and the two of us. “All I ask,” he added, “is that you maintain order.” And with no...

read more

Concerning This Little Frightened Child

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-61

At the end of the school day one February afternoon, shortly after my students had filed out of the classroom to catch their buses, Victor reappeared at my door. He had forgotten his math book. After rummaging frantically in his desk, he finally located it and charged back out of the room. A few minutes later, however, he was back and near...

read more

Reach up Your Hand, Dark Boy, and Take a Star

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 62-89

Derrick could barely read. Held back the previous year and self-consciously towering over the younger children, he was in danger of failing the fourth grade yet again, and that prospect terrified him. Derrick struggled to master the printed page. Approaching each reading assignment with a gritty determination, he tried valiantly to conquer the letters arrayed against him on the page, willing them...

read more

Larger Than Truth Can Be

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-115

Early one Saturday in March, Bill and I visited a nineteenth-century mill near where we lived. I have photographs we took of the mill that day. A barnlike structure with a high-pitched roof, it juts out over a turbulent river, anchored by massive stone pylons. Traces of snow still cover the north side of the roof in my photo, but spring has clearly...

read more

Where is the Jim Crow Section on the Merry Go Round?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-140

"BLACK AMERICANS MAKE PROGRESS,” the headline of the Weekly Reader announced in large block letters. I smiled to myself as I picked up the parcel of newspapers reserved for my class in the main office. I had been teaching at Morton Elementary for more than a month, and I had been searching for instructional materials on African...

read more

The Too-Rough Fingers of the World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-174

"There’s your problem,” Mrs. Stockton warned me during my first week at Morton, pointing to a good-looking boy seated in the back right-hand corner of the room. Marcus wasn’t from Louisa County. He had grown up in an impoverished section of Alexandria, Virginia, one of eight children. His mother was a prostitute and an alcoholic. His...

read more

It was a long time ago

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-214

I left Louisa that June, and I didn’t return for thirty-one years. In the intervening time, I went to graduate school and became a professor of English. I divorced and remarried (twice), acquired stepchildren, had a daughter, and raised a family. After studying and teaching at a number of universities, I joined the faculty of the University of Iowa and settled in Iowa City. I...

read more

Afterword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-224

A year after I quit my job at Z. C. Morton Elementary School, I took a summer work-study job at the Wright School, an integrated state elementary school for emotionally disturbed children in Durham, North Carolina. There, I assisted an experienced teacher with a master’s degree, working closely with the young children in our...

Notes on Sources

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-237

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-243