cover

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fm

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pp. i-iv

CONTENTS/TABLES

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pp. v-vi

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PREFACE

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pp. vii-xiv

In 1929 the late John R. Swanton of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology began work on a lexicon of the Timucua language of Florida (47th Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1932:2). During that year and in 1930, with the help of Miss Mae W. Tucker of the Bureau, Swanton worked through five of the primary sources of Frs. Francisco Pareja and Gregorio de Movilla, the two major...

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USER'S GUIDE

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pp. xv-xxvi

While there are only nine surviving primary sources in the Timucua language, all early 17th century, seven are of considerable length. They give us more than adequate documentation on which to base grammatical and lexical statements. Without these sources, in fact, we would be in total ignorance of the nature of the Timucua language. Some of these sources have considerable ethnographic value (see Milanich and...

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1. THE TIMUCUA LANGUAGE

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pp. 1-60

The Timucua language was spoken from an indeterminate position on the Georgia coast - at least as far north as the Altamaha River - south through north and central Florida to the Daytona Beach region. Southeastern Georgia as far inland as the Okefenokee Swamp, all of interior north Florida from the Aucilla River in the west to the Atlantic in the east, and all of central Florida from the Withlacoochee River east to Cape...

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2. TIMUCUA GRAMMAR

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pp. 63-110

Pareja designed an orthography for use in writing Timucua which was based largely on 17th-century Spanish spelling conventions (cf. Spaulding 1948). His keen insight lets us know what some of the salient phonological differences between Spanish and Timucua were, and he overtly describes allophonic detail carefully along with a presentation of minimal-pairs which makes parts of his grammar surprisingly modern (Adam...

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3. TIMUCUA-ENGLISH DICTIONARY

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pp. 113-177

Consult the USER'S GUIDE (pp. xvii-xxviii) for a detailed discussion of the entry of forms. The user should bear in mind the fact that inasmuch as many Timucua bases are non-specific with regard to morphemic part of speech - that is, they are unmarked by form - that designation is often left blank in an entry, specific syntactic part of speech usage being shown with the individual usages under the entry. Syntactic part of speech...

4. ENGLISH-TIMUCUA INDEX

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pp. 181-239

5. INDEX OF AFFIXES & AFFIX COMBINATIONS

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pp. 243-248

6. FORMS CITED FROM OTHER LANGUAGES

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pp. 251-274

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 277-292