Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Front Matter

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Figures and Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-xi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xiii

Much of the information in this book comes from the works of a group of scholars who have collaborated on Moundville research for over a decade. In addition to citing the various members of the group at the appropriate places in the text, I...

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-5

This study combines archaeological site catchment and locational data; stylistic, technological, and functional analysis of artifacts; and analysis of botanical and faunal remains in an effort to reconstruct the economy of a prehistoric chiefdom. There are several reasons for undertaking this study, beyond merely adding to our knowledge of past lifeways. Among students of cultural evolution there is widespread agreement that...

read more

2. Theoretical Background

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 6-22

The term chiefdom came to have a technical meaning in anthropology during the 1950s. Carneiro (1981) has recently reviewed this process, and interested readers are referred to his article for details. In brief, Oberg (1955) and Steward and Faron (1959) first used the term in a defined sense, to denote ranked, multivillage...

read more

3. The Test Case

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-75

The Mississippian chiefdom centered at Moundville, Alabama, during the eleventh to sixteenth centuries A.D., is archaeologically well known. An unusually large body of data on the chiefdom already exists, both in the literature and in museums. Previous analyses of...

read more

4. Subsistence

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-133

The production, distribution, and consumption of food is a vital sector of any economy. Thus, it seems a good place to begin an examination of the economic structure of a chiefdom. The redistribution model and the mobilization model posit very different ways for the subsistence sector...

read more

5. Craft Production

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-178

The production of nonsubsistence goods is examined in this chapter. Rather than repeating the cumbersome term nonsubsistence goods, I will use the term craft items. In common usage, this term carries connotations about the mode of production and visual attractiveness of the items, so that we think of...

read more

6. Structure and Operation of Moundville's Economy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-199

The pattern of production and distribution of goods in the Moundville chiefdom can be diagrammed in the same way as the economic models described in chapter two. Figure 6.1 depicts the economic structure of the chiefdom, though the complexity of the diagram has been reduced by showing only four local centers, rather than the six actually present in...

read more

7. Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 200-201

As a brief conclusion to this study, I think a review of its limitations and its unanswered questions is appropriate. The model of Moundville's economic organization that I present is an incomplete picture. It is based on current archaeological data, whose limitations I have repeatedly pointed out. The picture...

References Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 202-219

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 220-227

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 229

Paul D. Welch is Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Queens College, City University of New York. He received a bachelor's degree from Oberlin College and his master's and doctorate from the University of Michigan.