Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

As yet another hurricane season threatens the Caribbean, speculation turns to the potential for damage to the eastern coast of the Yucat

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1. The Public Interpretation of Archaeological Sites

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pp. 7-30

The most successful interpretive strategies introduce visitors to a greater appreciation for an archaeological site and its surrounding environment. Nevertheless, archaeologists have only recently begun to focus attention on how to effectively educate visitors about their excavation and research. Interpretation and research reports were written for the benefit of funding agencies and academic peers rather ...

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2. A Brief History of Mexican Archaeology

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pp. 31-36

The tradition of Mexican archaeology dates back to at least 1776, when an instrucci

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3. Heritage and Archaeological Tourism in Mexico and Quintana Roo

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pp. 37-50

As with the four S’s (sun, sea, sand, and sex) of mass resort tourism, Valene Smith (1996:287–300) has coined the four H’s of cultural or heritage tourism. Habitat refers to the geographic setting and underlying platform for the visit, whereas the term history implies postcontact relations between Westerners and aboriginal groups. Handicrafts manufactured by indigenous groups commemorate a visit and signify ...

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4. Living in the Yucat

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pp. 51-69

In this chapter I look at the present-day Maya who face the pressures of tourism and modernization mainly because they live near archaeological sites in Quintana Roo. Special attention is paid to my own and other ethnographic research in local communities. The term modernization is used in a more general sense for this analysis rather than as a shorthand for economic and development theory. For this ...

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5. A Discussion of Problems and Potential Remedies

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pp. 70-79

Over the 30-odd years of tourism development in the Maya Riviera, the pattern has remained the same: investors siphon off large sums of money, leaving only a little to trickle down to the lower socioeconomic levels where most Maya reside. Poverty is a real problem that needs to be addressed for the overall welfare of the region. Since the trickle-down method is clearly not working, it is necessary to find ...

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6. Mexican Cultural Identity and Patrimony in Quintana Roo

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pp. 80-90

The topics of cultural patrimony and cultural identity have been central to federal policies since the early years following Mexican independence. In the beginning, Mexico tried to play down the differences among the many ethnic groups in order to present a unified Mexican identity where everyone spoke Spanish and identified themselves first and foremost as Mexican. It was not long before the Mexican ...

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7. Public Interpretation at Mexican Museums

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pp. 91-100

Mexican museums have been especially influential in creating a national identity, and one of the ways they have done this has been through the promotion of local artisan production of arts and crafts. Whenever artisans are encouraged to re-create older designs as part of their modern craft production, they are also functioning as repositories for collecting, conserving, and interpreting the symbols ...

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8. Conclusion

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pp. 101-104

These words convey a foreboding about the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors, but they might also express the viewpoint of today’s Maya who are engulfed by tourism. Without doubt, the state of Quintana Roo continues to undergo unprecedented and radical changes as more and more land is converted into luxury hotels, gas stations, and tourist attractions. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 105-118

Index

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pp. 119-121